SUPERFUND RE-VISIONING PROJECT

2016

The Superfund Re-Visioning Project is an experimental artistic process that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are one hundred and seventeen Superfund Sites, this project will focus on transforming and energetically remediating those sites by redirecting potential energy toward alternate futures using combinations of photography, dance, video, song, sculpture, writing, and drawing.

Superfund sites are polluted locations requiring a long-term response to clean up hazardous material and contaminations. CERCLA authorized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create a list of such locations, which are placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). CERCLA stands for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, known also as Superfund. It was passed in 1980 in response to some alarming and decidedly unacceptable hazardous waste practices and management going on in the 1970s. While CERCLA and other Government agencies have been able to compile large lists, testing, and data their processes often lack resolve and are tremendously expensive. Environmental contaminations such as those found in many of the New York State Superfund Sites has been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global warming.

Three New York State Superfund sites have been preliminarily re-visioned In order to illustrate the process of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project and to function as examples for interested artists and community members to consider. The preliminary Superfund site re-visions include the Boices Lane Office Depot building in Kingston, NY., a defunct IBM Industrial Complex in Kingston, NY, and an archived Superfund site located in West Hurley, NY called Numrich Arms that has operated as a weapons and ammunition manufacturing facility. 

IBM / Tech City Re-Vision

September 2016 - This Video is part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project and works directly with the archived superfund site located at the IBM Tech City Industrial Complex location in Kingston, NY. Dance- Lucie Parker
 

1. BOICES LANE OFFICE DEPOT

The Office Depot Superfund Site has been re-visioned as a future bio dome for butterflies. 

Project Completion Date:  2816

 

State environmental officials have added the Boices Lane plaza where Office Depot used to operate to a list of Superfund sites that pose a threat to public health. The Department of Environmental Conservation, in a notification dated Oct. 21, said the contamination was found in an area of the property where there previously was a dry cleaner. “Based on investigations the primary contaminants of concern include tetrachlorethylene (PCE) and its degradation products in the groundwater, soil, soil vapor and/or indoor air,” the department wrote.

 

2. IBM / TECH CITY KINGSTON 

The archived IBM Superfund site has been re-visioned as a research and treatment center for those who have lost the ability to communicate telepathically. 

Project Completion Date: May 5, 4011 

 

The condemned IBM / Tech City complex is a superfund site located along Neighborhood Rd in Kingston, NY. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as IBM / Tech City because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. IIBM is currently registered as an archived superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up action or further investigation at this time.

 

 

3. NUMRICH GUN PARTS CORPORATION

Numrich Gun Parts Corporation has been re-visioned as the future archaeological dig site revealing artifacts that will implicate technologies role in the destruction of humans. 

Project Completion Date: May 5, 3016

 

Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is a weapons and ammunition manufacturing plant and distribution center located in West Hurley, NY. that had been investigated for lead contamination of nearby residential water wells. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as Numrich Gun Parts Corporation because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is currently registered as an archived Superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up, action, or further investigation at this time.

 

The effectiveness of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project lies in its ability to utilize a combination of existing contaminated locations and factual documentation of specific contaminating factors in conjunction with fictional and ridiculous psychic predictions presented as fact in order to further blur the lines between science and belief and to challenge the validity of projected and legitimized possible future outcomes. In this way, The Superfund Re-Visioning Project shifts belief and science in a way that helps us recognize our own ridiculousness as a possible culprit. Ridiculous circumstances call for a ridiculous approach.

 

Within The Superfund Re-Visioning Project, and specifically in the case of environmental contamination, levels of ridiculousness may indicate high probability of successful outcome. Because Earth's current level of environmental contamination and global warming are ridiculous, it is logical to conclude a solution based on ridiculousness. This is a creative artistic approach to shifting perception of science and logic. 

The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell Burns By Proxy
September 2016 - The Giant Candle Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy is a video spell designed as part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project. This video works remotely with an undisclosed location in Ulster County, NY that is the subject of industrial solvent contamination, death threats, labor rights violations, hauntings, and suicide by forklift. The Giant Candle burns by proxy to cleanse the location remotely. Voice- Brittany Holly Hannah / Dance- Lucie Parker.

LIST OF NEW YORK STATE SUPERFUND SITES

(from https://www.epa.gov/superfund/search-superfund-sites-where-you-live)

1. American Thermostat Co., Greene NY

 

The American Thermostat Co. site is located in South Cairo, New York. Thermostat manufacturing for small appliances led to volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in the ground water. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201350

 

2. Griffiss Air Force Base, Oneida NY

 

The Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB) site is located in Rome, New York. The 3,552-acre base began operations in 1943 under the Air Combat Command and served as home to various Air Force operations over the years. On July 1, 1970, the 416th Bombardment Wing of the Strategic Air Command was activated with the mission of maintenance and implementation of both effective air refueling operations and long-range bombardment capability, but in 1993 and 1995, Griffiss AFB was designated for realignment under the Base Realignment and Closure Act which resulted in the deactivation of the 416th Bombardment Wing in September 1995. While active base operations have now ceased and been relocated to other areas across the county, the Rome Laboratory, Northeast Air Defense Sector and the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS) still operate at the base. 

 

During the 50 years of operation, hazardous wastes were generated from various activities including: aircraft operation; testing and maintenance; firefighting exercises; discharge of munitions; landfill operations; and research and development activities. Over the years, these wastes were disposed of in landfills and dry wells located across the base which led to investigations into contamination that could pose threats to public health and the environment. 

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202438

 

3. Love Canal, Niagara NY

 

The Love Canal site (Site) is located in Niagara Falls, New York. It was one of two initial excavations in what was to be a canal to provide inexpensive hydroelectric power for industrial development around the turn of the 20th century.  The abandoned excavation, partially filled with water, was used largely for recreational purposes.  The canal was about 9,750 feet long and ranged in depth from 10 to 25 feet. Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corporation (now Occidental Chemical Corporation, or OXY) disposed of over 21,000 tons of hazardous chemicals into the abandoned Love Canal between 1942 and 1953, contaminating soil and groundwater.  In 1953, the landfill was covered and leased to the Niagara Falls Board of Education (NFBE).  Afterwards, the area near the covered landfill was extensively developed, including construction of an elementary school, as well as many residential properties.

 

The fenced 70-acre Site includes the original 16-acre hazardous waste landfill and a 40-acre cap, as well as a drainage system and leachate collection and treatment system that are in place and operating.

Beginning in the 1970s, local residents noticed foul odors and chemical residues and experienced increased rates of cancer and other health problems.  In 1978 and 1980, President Carter declared two federal environmental emergencies for the Site, and about 950 families were evacuated from their homes within a 10-square-block area surrounding the landfill.  This area was eventually referred to as the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) and was subsequently divided into seven areas as related to habitability concerns.

 

The severity of the Site’s contamination ultimately led to the creation of federal legislation to manage the disposal of hazardous waste.  This legislation was named the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Law) of 1980.

 

In September 1983, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) listed the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and began to work with New York State (NYS) to clean up the Site.  In 1999, the EPA and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) completed remedy construction in 1999.  The EPA deleted the Site from the NPL in 2004.

 

As a result of the extent of the contamination at the Site, the response action was addressed in several stages focused on landfill containment with leachate collection; treatment and disposal; excavation and treatment of the sewer and creek sediment and other wastes; cleanup of the 93rd Street School soils; the purchase, maintenance and rehabilitation of properties; and, other short-term cleanup actions.

 

As a result of these cleanup actions, the Site no longer presents a threat to human health and the environment.  In September 2004, the EPA removed the Site from the Superfund program’s NPL.  As a result of the revitalization efforts of the Love Canal Area Revitalization Agency (LCARA), new homeowners have moved into the habitable areas of the Love Canal.  More than 260 formerly abandoned homes in the affected area were rehabilitated and sold to new residents, creating a viable new neighborhood.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201290

4. Hudson River PCBs, Washington, NY

General Electric's pollution of the Hudson River with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between 1947 and 1977 is the major historic contamination of the Hudson River Valley. This pollution caused a range of harmful effects to wildlife and people who eat fish from the river or drink the water. In response to this contamination, activists protested in various ways. Musician Pete Seeger founded the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the Clearwater Festival to draw attention to the problem. The activism led to the site being designated as one of the superfund sites. Other kinds of pollution, including mercury contamination and sewage dumping, have also caused problems.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollution_of_the_Hudson_River

5. Onondaga Lake Onondaga, NY

Onondaga Lake is a lake in Central New York located northwest of Syracuse, New York. The southeastern end of the lake and the southwestern shore abut industrial areas and expressways; the northeastern shore and northwestern end border a series of parks and museums.[1]

 

 

Onondaga watershed

Although it is near the Finger Lakes region, it is not traditionally counted as one of the Finger Lakes. Onondaga Lake is a dimictic lake,[2] meaning that the lake water completely mixes from top to bottom twice a year. The lake is 4.6 miles long and 1 mile wide making a surface area of 4.6 square miles.[2] The maximum depth of the lake is 63 feet with an average depth of 35 feet.[3] Its drainage basin has a surface area of 642 square kilometers, encompassing Syracuse, Onondaga County except the eastern and northern edges, the southeastern corner of Cayuga County and the Onondaga Nation Territory,[4] and supports approximately 450,000 people.[5]

 

Onondaga Lake has two natural tributaries that contribute approximately 70% of the total water flow to the lake. These tributaries are: Ninemile Creek and Onondaga Creek. The Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant (METRO) contributes 20% of the annual flow.[3][6] No other lake in the United States receives as much of its inflow as treated wastewater.[7] The other tributaries, which include Ley Creek, Bloody Brook, Harbor Brook, Sawmill Creek, Tributary 5A, and East Flume, contribute the remaining 10% of water flow into the lake.[3][6] The tributaries flush the lake out about four times a year.[5] Onondaga Lake is flushed much more rapidly than most other lakes.[6] The lake flows to the northwest[8] and discharges into Seneca River which combines with the Oneida River to form the Oswego River, and ultimately ends up in Lake Ontario.[2]

 

The lake is considered sacred within the indigenous territory of the Onondaga Nation. The Onondaga people lost control of the lake to New York State following the American Revolutionary War. During the late 19th century, European-Americans built many resorts along the lake's shoreline, as it was a destination of great beauty. The Onondaga Nation still has religious and cultural on the Shores of the Lake today.

 

With the industrialization of the region, much of the lake's shoreline was developed; domestic and industrial waste, due to industry and urbanization, led to the severe degradation of the lake. Unsafe levels of pollution led to the banning of ice harvesting as early as 1901. In 1940, swimming was banned, and in 1970 fishing was banned due to mercury contamination.[2][5] Mercury pollution is still a problem for the lake today.[3] Despite the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1973 and the closing of the major industrial polluter in 1986, Onondaga Lake is still one of the most polluted lakes in the United States. Several initiatives, including a 15-year multi-stage program currently under way, have been recently[when?] undertaken to clean up the lake.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onondaga_Lake

 

6. Pfohl Brothers Landfill, Erie, NY (REMOVED)

The Pfohl Brothers Landfill site is located in Cheektowaga, New York, approximately one mile east of the Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The privately-owned landfill received municipal and industrial waste between 1932 and 1971. After the cleanup of the site, EPA took it off of the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2008.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201751

 

7. Applied Environmental Services, Nassau, NY

The Applied Environmental Services site, also known as the Shore Realty site, is located in Glenwood Landing, New York. Petrochemical facility operations contaminated site soil and groundwater. Short-term cleanups, also known as removal actions, included drum and fencing removal and liquid waste collection. Long-term cleanup – soil vapor extraction for contaminated soils and a pump-and-treat system with bioremediation for contaminated groundwater – is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202121

 

8. Seneca Army Depot, Seneca, NY

 

The Seneca Army Depot Activity (SEDA) site is located in Romulus, New York. It covers 10,587 acres. The U.S. Army has operated the facility and stored and disposed of military explosives there between 1941 and 2000, when SEDA closed. Following recommendation by DoD, approval by the Base Closure Commission, the President and Congress, SEDA was approved for the 1995 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) list in October 1995.  Some parts of the base have been transferred to various entities, prison and correctional authorities, as well as the Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). Current reuse plans project that most of the site property will be transferred for wildlife conservation, recreation, industrial and warehousing land uses. The site is being addressed through a Federal Facility Agreement between the Army, EPA and the State of New York. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing and it is expected to be completed in 2017.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202425

 

9.  Black River PCBs Jefferson, NY

 

The Black River PCBs site is located along the Black River in Champion, Carthage and West Carthage in Jefferson County, New York. The site is currently delineated as a three mile stretch of the Black River. The site consists of PCB-contaminated sediment that was a result of historical industrial discharges, and, at least in part, from wastewater discharged from the Carthage/West Carthage Water Pollution Control Facility, a sewage treatment plant. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. EPA is currently investigating site conditions.

 

 https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206296

10. Dewey Loeffel Landfill, Rensselaer, NY

 

The Dewey Loeffel Landfill Superfund site is located in Rensselaer County, New York. In the 1950s and 1960s, site was used as a disposal facility for more than 46,000 tons of industrial hazardous wastes, including solvents, waste oils, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), scrap materials, sludges and solids. Some hazardous substances, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PCBs, have migrated from the facility to underlying aquifers and downstream surface water bodies, resulting in contamination of groundwater, surface water, sediments and several species of fish. There is currently a fish consumption advisory for Nassau Lake and the surrounding water bodies. Site investigations are underway to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and inform the development of permanent cleanup options for the site.

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201218

11. Hudson Technologies, Inc., Rockland, NY

 

The Hudson Technologies, Inc. (HTI) site is located in Hillburn, New York. The 3-acre site was the location of a freon recycling facility. HTI’s activities at the facility included purifying spent refrigerant and returning it to customers. HTI began operations at the site in June 1994. Facility operations and spills contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site is being addressed through state actions. If HTI does not carry out cleanup activities, as specified, in the state enforcement agreement, EPA would finalize the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and begin the Superfund site cleanup process.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204251

 

 

12. Newtown Creek, Kings and Queens, NY

 

On September 7, 2011, an agreement was reached between EPA and Phelps Dodge Refining Corporation, Texaco Inc., BP products North America, Brooklyn Union Gas Company d/b/a National Grid NY, ExxonMobil Oil Corporation, and, The City of New York to begin work at the Newtown Creek Superfund Site. The agreement provides for a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) and certain cost recovery relating to liabilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, (CERCLA, more commonly known as Superfund).

 

https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/case-summary-settlement-reached-newtown-creek-superfund-site

 

13. Brewster Well Field, Putnam, NY

 

The Brewster Well Field site is located in Brewster, New York. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found in the village of Brewster’s well field water distribution system in 1978. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Subsequent testing revealed a large plume of groundwater contamination. EPA traced the source of the contamination to a dry cleaner. Operators disposed of dry cleaning wastes in a dry well next to the business until 1983. Between 1978 and 1984, the Village of Brewster used several new well drilling, blending and pumping strategies to keep contaminant levels down. In 1984, the village partnered with EPA to put in a treatment system. The goal was to remove the VOCs and provide safe drinking water to about 2,000 area residents.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202153

 

 

14. Brookhaven National Laboratory (USDOE), Suffolk, NY

 

The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is a research and development facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It covers 5,265 acres in Upton, New York. The DOE conducts research in physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and energy technologies. The lab is about 8 square miles in size. Much of the environmental contamination at the lab is from accidental spills and historical storage and disposal of chemical and radiological materials. Many cleanup activities have been completed; other cleanup efforts are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202841

 

 

15. Byron Barrel & Drum, Genesee, NY

 

The Byron Barrel & Drum site is located in Genesee County, New York. The site is about 2 acres of an 8-acre property off of Transit Road in a rural area. The site was used as a salvage yard for heavy construction equipment; hazardous wastes were also disposed of there. Drums of chemical wastes were abandoned on site without any spill control or containment provisions. Other drums were ripped open or crushed, mixed with soil, and covered over, contaminating soil and groundwater with hazardous substances. Emergency actions to protect human health and the environment have been completed. Long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202257

 

16. Carroll & Dubies Sewage Disposal, Orange, NY

 

The Caldwell Trucking Co. site is located in Fairfield Township, New Jersey. It consists of properties and groundwater contaminated by the disposal of residential, commercial and industrial septic waste. Immediate actions to protect human health and the environment and soil cleanup have been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201492

 

 

17. Cayuga County Ground Water Contamination, Cayuga, NY

 

The Cayuga Groundwater Contamination site includes contaminated groundwater that covers about 4.8 square miles extending from Auburn to Union Springs, New York. It includes the townships of Aurelius, Fleming and Springport. The site contains mostly residential properties mixed with farmland, woodlands and commercial areas. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The General Electric Company (GE) owned and manufactured semiconductors at a facility on Genesee Street in Auburn. For a time, Powerex, Inc. a joint venture of GE and others, bought the facility and conducted similar operations there. EPA has finalized a plan to address the contaminated groundwater.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204289

 

 

18. Circuitron Corp., Suffolk, NY

 

The Circuitron Corporation site was located at 82 Milbar Boulevard, East Farmingdale, New York. Circuitron Corporation manufactured electronic circuit boards on the 1-acre area from 1961 to 1986. The manufacturing process at the facility included drilling, screening, plating and scrubbing processes, all of which generated chemical wastes. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, soils, sediment and a building with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily 1,1,1-trichloroethane and tetrachloroethene. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air and can migrate from the soils into the groundwater. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202301

 

 

19. Claremont Polychemical Nassau, NY

 

The Claremont Polychemical site is the former location of a manufacturer of pigments for plastics and inks. The facility operated from 1966 to 1980. The 9.5-site is located in an industrial section of Old Bethpage in Nassau County, New York. Facility operations contaminated soil, groundwater and a building with volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the 

environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201338

 

20. Colesville Municipal Landfill, Broome, NY

 

The Colesville Municipal Landfill site is an inactive landfill in Colesville, New York. The Town of Colesville owned and operated the 35-acre landfill from 1965 until 1969, when ownership transferred to Broome County. The landfill accepted about 9,000 tons of municipal waste each year. From 1973 to 1975, industrial wastes such as organic solvents, dyes and metals were placed in the landfill, resulting in groundwater contamination. The landfill closed in 1984. Capping of the 35-acre landfill and treatment of contaminated groundwater has significantly reduced the threat to public health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202237

21. Computer Circuits, Suffolk, NY

 

The Computer Circuits site is located in an industrial park in Hauppauge, New York. From 1969 to 1977, Computer Circuits Corporation operated a circuit board manufacturing facility at the 2-acre property, discharged industrial wastewaters into industrial cesspools on site. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with copper and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air.  VOC contaminants (in particular, trichloroethylene (TCE)) were also identified at levels of concern in indoor air.  Contaminants in groundwater and indoor air posed a risk to human health.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202636

22. Consolidated Iron and Metal, Orange, NY

 

The Consolidated Iron and Metal site is an inactive car and scrap metal junkyard in Newburgh, New York.  From World War I until the early 1940s, the Eureka Shipyard operated at the 7-acre site.  Consolidated Iron and Metal Company’s scrap metal processing and storage operations began in the mid-1950s and continued at the site until the facility's closure in 1999.  Facility operations led to soil contamination.  Contaminants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204175

 

23. Cortese Landfill, Sullivan, NY

 

The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867

24. The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. 

 

From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867

 

 

25. Diaz Chemical Corporation, Orleans, NY

 

The Diaz Chemical Corporation (Diaz Chemical) site is located in Holley, New York. The area includes the Diaz Chemical facility and parts of the surrounding residential neighborhood. Following an accidental release of a chemical mixture in 2002, members of the public complained of acute health effects. Residents voluntarily relocated from some of the homes in the neighborhood to area hotels with assistance from Diaz Chemical. In May 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assumed responsibility for the relocation expenses of the residents who remained relocated at that time, secured the site and removed contaminated materials. In June 2003, Diaz Chemical filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the facility, leaving behind large volumes of chemicals in drums and tanks. Immediate cleanup actions at the site have protected immediate threats to human health and the environment. A thermal treatment remedy was selected for the site in 2012. Design and construction efforts related to the site’s long-term cleanup are underway.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203341

 

26. Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal, Ulster, NY

 

The Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal site is located in Ellenville, New York. It includes a 24-acre former scrap iron and metal reclamation facility and several nearby residential properties. About 10 acres of the site were used for scrap metal operations and battery reclamation from 1950 to 1997. In late 1997, the area was used for landfill purposes and as a tire dump before being abandoned. Following site investigations and short-term cleanups called removal actions, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place to protect human health and the environment. Operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204190

 

27. Endicott Village Well Field, Broome, NY

 

The Endicott Village Well Field site is located in Endicott, New York. The site includes a Ranney Well and its zone of influence on area groundwater. The boundaries of this zone are the Susquehanna River to the south, West Main Street to the north, Grippen Park to the east and Endicott Landfill to the west. EPA detected vinyl chloride and trace amounts of other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the discharge from the Ranney Well. The landfill is the source of the contamination. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202264

28. Facet Enterprises, Inc., Chemung, NY

 

The Facet Enterprises, Inc. Superfund site is located in Elmira Heights, Chemung County, New

York. The remedy for the site includes: the excavation of contaminated soils and sediments; the

construction of a ground water pump and treat system; the construction of an on-site landfill; and the implementation of institutional controls. The trigger for this third five-year review was the

previous five-year review signed on September 28, 2007.

Based upon reviews of the 1992 Record of Decision (ROD), operation and maintenance reports,

a site visit conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) personnel on September

27, 2011, it has been determined that ground water data at the site requires further evaluation to

ensure that the site-related contamination is effectively captured and treated by the existing

remedy. Evaluation of the vapor intrusion exposure pathway at additional residences needs to be conducted. Therefore, a protectiveness determination for this site cannot be made until the noted additional information is obtained and evaluated. 

 

https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/149104.pdf

 

29. FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill,) Orleans, NY

 

The FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill) site is an inactive waste site in the towns of Ridgeway and Shelby in Orleans County, New York. The 30-acre site includes a 21-acre area that contains two inactive rock quarries and wooded property, and a 9-acre area to the south containing a waste pile, a rectangular pond and a swamp. From 1933 to 1968, about 6 acres of the south parcel were used to dispose of coal ash cinders, laboratory wastes consisting of glass bottles and chemical residues, residues from lime sulfur filtration, building debris and residues from pesticide production areas. The site’s long-term cleanup has been completed, protecting human health and the environment. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201207

30. Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision, Niagara, NY

 

The Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. Prior to 1973, the 39-acre area was used for illegal chemical waste disposal, contaminating soil and groundwater with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Residential development of the site property took place in 1979. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202361

31. Fulton Avenue, Nassau, NY

 

The Fulton Avenue site is located at 150 Fulton Avenue in Garden City Park in Nassau County, New York.

A fabric-cutting mill operated at the 0.8-acre area from 1965 through 1974. The mill’s operations contaminated soil and water with hazardous chemicals. Soil cleanup has been completed. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203853

32. Fulton Terminals, Oswego, NY

 

The 1.5-acre Fulton Terminals site is located in an urban area adjacent to the Oswego River in Fulton, New York. Millions of gallons of waste, oils, and sludge were stored in tanks at the site and groun water, soil, and sediments were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Work has been done to clean up visibly-contaminated soil and tar-like wastes, excavate  storm drains, remove contaminated soil and treat groundwater. Physical cleanup activites at the site have been completed. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202125

33. GCL Tie & Treating Inc., Delaware, NY

 

The GCL Tie and Treating (GCL) site is located in Sidney, New York. The 60-acre site includes two major areas – the GCL property and the non-GCL property. The 26-acre GCL property consists of an inactive sawmill and wood treating facility. The non-GCL portion of the site includes two light manufacturing companies located on a parcel of land next to the GCL property. Threats posed by contaminated soil, aboveground tanks and drums containing creosote wastes and sludges have been addressed. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Area residents receive drinking water from public supply wells, which are routinely tested to ensure compliance with federal and state standards. Fencing restricts access to the site.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203408

34. GE Moreau, Saratoga, NY

 

The GE Moreau site is located in Moreau, New York. A pit on the site was used by the General Electric Company (GE) for the disposal of industrial waste from 1958 to 1968. Soil, surface water and groundwater are contaminated with hazardous substances. Cleanup actions at the site were completed in 1990, and maintenance and monitoring are ongoing. While groundwater at the site continues to exceed federal cleanup levels for several chemicals of concern, there are currently no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks to the public. 

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201858

 

35. General Motors (Central Foundry Division,) St. Lawrence, NY

 

The General Motors (Central Foundry Division) site is located in Massena, New York. The cleanup of the GM site is ongoing and is being addressed in stages: immediate actions, which included the installation of a cap on the Industrial Landfill at the site in the late 1980’s to prevent the surface flow of contaminants and reduce potential air exposure from contaminants, and  long-term cleanup phases focusing on the cleanup of St. Lawrence and Raquette River system sediments; excavation and removal of contaminated on-site soils; removal of contaminated soil and sediment on St. Regis Mohawk Tribal properties (including Turtle Cove); and treatment of contaminated groundwater. 

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201644

 

 

36. Genzale Plating Co., Nassau, NY

 

The Genzale Plating Company site is located in Franklin Square, New York. It includes a metal-plating facility, an attached two-story office building and an undeveloped backyard area that served as a parking lot and storage area. From 1915 through 2000, the facility electroplated small products such as automobile antennas, parts of ball point pens, and bottle openers. It discharged wastewater containing heavy metals as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four subsurface leaching pits at the rear of the site. Soil cleanup has been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201344

 

 

37. Goldisc Recordings, Inc., Suffolk, NY

 

The Goldisc Recordings site is located in Holbrook, New York. The 34-acre area consists of two one-story buildings that occupy 6 acres, 3 acres of pavement surrounding the buildings and 25 acres of undeveloped land. Between 1968 and 1983, Audio Visual, Inc. manufactured audio visual and optical devices, and Goldisc Recordings, Inc. manufactured phonograph records. Wastes generated included large quantities of nickel-plating wastes and hydraulic oil, and lesser quantities of solvents. Plating wastes were stored in aboveground storage tanks. On several occasions, the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) found chemical wastes in storm drains, holding ponds and dry wells. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Source materials have been cleaned up. Additional groundwater monitoring is expected to continue.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202239

 

38. Gowanus Canal, Kings, NY

 

The Gowanus Canal is a 100-foot wide, 1.8-mile long canal in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. The Canal is bounded by several communities, including Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens and Red Hook. The Canal empties into New York Harbor. The adjacent waterfront is primarily commercial and industrial, currently consisting of concrete plants, warehouses and parking lots.

 

The Gowanus Canal was built in the mid-1800s and was used as a major industrial transportation route. Manufactured gas plants (MGP), paper mills, tanneries and chemical plants operated along the Canal and discharged wastes into it. In addition, contamination flows into the Canal from overflows from sewer systems that carry sanitary waste from homes and rainwater from storm drains and industrial pollutants. As a result, the Gowanus Canal has become one of the nation's most seriously contaminated water bodies. More than a dozen contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and heavy metals, including mercury, lead and copper, are found at high levels in the sediment in the Canal.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206222

 

 

39. Haviland Complex , Dutchess, NY

 

The Haviland Complex site covers 275 acres in Hyde Park, New York. It includes an apartment complex, a junior high school, an elementary school, a shopping center and several homes. Failure of the septic and sewage systems of a car wash and laundromat contaminated area groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

 

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202284

40. Hertel Landfill, Ulster, NY

 

he Hertel Landfill site is located in Plattekill, New York. The 80-acre area is an inactive waste disposal area. It was established in 1963 as a municipal waste landfill. Until 1977, about 15 acres of the land were used for disposal, contaminating soil, groundwater and surface water with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup activities, long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202267

41. Hiteman Leather, Herkimer, NY

 

The Hiteman Leather site was the location of a former tannery and leather manufacturing facility located in the Village of West Winfield, New York. Approximately 180,000 gallons of chromium-containing wastewater was discharged from the tannery into three unlined lagoons and nearby wetlands, which drain into the Unadilla River. Settled solids in the lagoons were periodically excavated and deposited as bank material around the lagoons. 

 

In 1996, EPA conducted an investigation at the site that found elevated levels of chromium in the soil and surface water. Several other contaminants were detected at low levels in soils, including metals, pesticides, semi-volatiles and volatiles. The investigation also found asbestos-covered pipes throughout the main former tannery building and determined that the wood-framed sections of the building were structurally unsound. 

 

Following a comprehensive study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate cleanup alternatives, EPA selected a cleanup remedy for the site in September 2006. It included excavation of contaminated soil hot spots from the former tannery property; excavation and dredging of contaminated wetland and river sediments next to the former tannery property; solidification (the addition of cement additives to change the physical and chemical characteristics to immobilize contaminants) and consolidation of the excavated/dredged soils and sediments on the former tannery property; placement of a soil cover; and intermittent groundwater extraction and treatment. The cleanup remedy also indicated that the need for remediation of river sediments downstream of the former tannery would be determined based on further testing.

 

During the design of the cleanup remedy, EPA determined that soils did not require solidification prior to disposal, that downstream sediments did not need to be remediated, and that groundwater contamination was not related to disposal activities at the site. EPA updated the site’s cleanup remedy to reflect these findings in 2008. The site cleanup finished in September 2008.

After addressing the contaminated soils and sediments, EPA removed the site from the National Priorities List in February 2012. EPA will continue to assess conditions at the site every five years to ensure that the cleanup continues to be protective of human health and the environment.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202360

 

42. Hooker (Hyde Park,) Niagara, NY

 

The Hooker (Hyde Park) site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 15-acre area was used for the disposal of about 80,000 tons of waste, some of it hazardous material, from 1953 to 1975, resulting in sediment and groundwater contamination with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to nearby residents or the environment. Construction of the site’s remedy finished in September 2003. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201306

 

 

43. Occidental Petroleum, Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp, Hooker (S Area,) Niagara, NY

 

 

The Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp. site is located in Hicksville, New York.  The 14-acre area is the location of a chemical manufacturing facility that operated from 1945 to 2002.  Industrial wastewater discharges, as well as leaks and chemical spills, contaminated site soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals.  Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment.  Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201477

 

 

44. Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp., Nassau, NY

 

 

45. New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY

 

The New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination site (Site) is an area of widespread groundwater contamination in the Towns of North Hempstead, Hempstead and Oyster Bay in Nassau County, New York. Sampling found contaminants in four Town of Hempstead wells, six Hamlet of Hicksville wells and one Village of Westbury well. The primary contaminants observed in groundwater at the Site are tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily into the air and dissolve in water. VOCs are often used as ingredients in paints, solvents, aerosol sprays, cleaners, disinfectants, automotive products and dry cleaning fluids. It is believed that past industrial and commercial activities in the area may have contributed to the groundwater contamination at the site. Consistent with the Safe Drinking Water Act that protects public drinking water supplies throughout the nation, the public water suppliers in the area of the Site monitor water quality regularly and have previously installed treatment systems to remove VOCs from groundwater.

 

From 1988 to 2010, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) identified a number of sources of the contamination and further investigated the contaminated groundwater pursuant to New York State authorities.  In 2010, NYSDEC requested that EPA list the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL).  The Site was listed on the NPL in September 2011. EPA is addressing the Site in discrete phases or components known as operable units or OUs. After the Site’s NPL listing, site investigations to determine the nature and extent of contamination and to identify and evaluate remedial alternatives began

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203974

 

46. Hopewell Precision Area Contamination, Dutchess, NY

 

The Hopewell Precision site is located in Hopewell Junction, New York. The 5.7-acre area was the location of a manufacturing facility that produced sheet metal parts and assemblies. Operations on site contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA is working to identify the potential for exposure to contaminants at the site and developing the site’s long-term remedy.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201588

 

47. Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill, Suffolk, NY

 

The Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill site is located in Islip, New York. The 55-acre landfill is part of a 109-acre complex operated by the Islip Resource Recovery Agency. The Town of Islip operated the landfill from 1963 to 1990. Wastes disposed of at the landfill contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Operation and maintenance activities are ongoing, including the operation of a groundwater treatment system.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201714

 

48. Jackson Steel, Nassau, NY

 

The Jackson Steel site is an inactive "roll form metal shapes" manufacturing facility in Mineola and North Hempstead, New York. Jackson Steel operated at the site from 1970 to 1991. The site is bordered to the north by commercial and single-family dwellings, to the east by a two-story apartment complex, to the south by a daycare center, and to the west by an office building and restaurant.   Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Currently, there are no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks. None is expected as long as the site use does not change and vapor mitigation systems continue to be properly operated, monitored and maintained.

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204218

 

49. Johnstown City Landfill, Fulton, NY

 

The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The industrial wastes generated by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. SludgeExternal Web Site Icon from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records indicating the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill.

 

On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the United States Environmental Protection AgencyExternal Web Site Icon (US EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC). In June 1989, the NYS DOH completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). A conclusion in the preliminary health assessment was that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and that the most significant public health concern was the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells. Recommendations of the preliminary health assessment included the need to further characterize the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater and at the site.

 

A remedial investigation (RI) was conducted at the site between June 1989 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments, air, and studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. The preferred remedy for the site was finalized in a March 1993 record of decision (ROD) and includes:

 

Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit;

Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound;

Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to private homes;

Erection of a security fence around the landfill mound;

Institution of land-use restrictions; and

Environmental monitoring which will include long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments.

Past public health concerns included the potential for contaminants to migrate to the City of Johnstown public water supply Wells 1 and 2 on Maple Avenue southeast of the site as well as the possibility of contamination of private drinking water supplies downgradient of the landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have sampled residential wells near the site and participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill.

 

Exposure to organic contaminants in private water supplies occurred in the past. One residential water supply had contaminants above NYS DOH drinking water standards. This property was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980; the well was properly abandoned and the property remains vacant. Prior to 1980, when contamination was first detected, it is not known how long or if users of this water supply were exposed to organic contaminants. Past completed exposure pathways to site contaminants include exposure to on-site wastes and leachate. However, there are no contaminant data to evaluate the public health significance of these past exposures. Potential human exposure pathways to contaminants originating at the landfill include ingestion of fish; inhalation of VOCs and particulate chromium in ambient air, direct contact, ingestion and inhalation of VOCs in surface water sediment, leachate, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to contaminants in surface water, groundwater, leachate, on-site waste, sediment in LaGrange Gravel Pit and drinking water will be eliminated once the selected remedy for clean-up of the site is in place.

 

Because of past, present and possible future human exposures to contaminants in drinking water and potential (past and present) exposures to contaminants in fish and surface water, the Johnstown City Landfill poses a public health hazard. ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) has evaluated this Public Health Assessment to determine appropriate follow-up health activities. The HARP determined that those persons exposed in the past should be considered for inclusion in the NYS DOH's registry being developed for VOC exposures from drinking contaminated water. The proposed measures for remediation of the Johnstown City Landfill as described in the ROD should be carried out to eliminate the potential for human exposure to contaminants at and near the landfill. Specifically, public water should be extended to the affected and potentially affected residences with private water supplies, since initial groundwater remediation does not include pumping and treating of the groundwater contaminant plume.

 

BACKGROUND

 

A. Site Description and History

 

The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is 1.5 miles northwest of the City of Johnstown and 1.75 miles west of the City of Gloversville on West Fulton Street Extension in Fulton County, New York (refer to Figures 1 and 2, Appendix A). Prior to landfill operations, the site was used extensively for excavation of sand and gravel. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The landfill had been used for the disposal of wastes for 12 years by three septic tank and industrial waste haulers. The industrial wastes were generated primarily by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. Sludge from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records available which indicate the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill. Most of the tannery wastes were disposed as chromium-treated hide trimmings and other materials. Sewage sludge was disposed in open piles on-site for six years between 1973 and 1979 and reportedly contained chromium, iron and lead. Sewage sludge was disposed at a rate of about 20,000 cubic yards per year (yds3/yr). A former disposal pit on the westward side of the landfill was used for demolition debris and metals wastes. Reportedly, an unknown number of drums containing chemicals were also disposed at the site.

 

The landfill consists of two flat terraces and a former disposal pit at the base of a steep ridge on the westward side of the landfill. Currently, the landfill has an interim (native soil) cover and there are several leachate outbreaks at the foot of the landfill on-site and at an off-site downgradient spring (LaGrange Spring). The site has two fences with locked gates at the main site entrance, which prevent vehicular access. These fences were installed before the landfill was closed in 1989, to prevent unauthorized dumping. The rest of the site perimeter is heavily wooded or borders active farmlands.

 

Past investigations completed at and near the Johnstown City Landfill include:

 

A sanitary landfill study of the City of Johnstown Landfill which was completed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) in April 1978;

 

A study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek, which was conducted by the NYS DEC in November 1978;

 

A methane gas migration study completed by the NYS DEC in September 1981;

 

A preliminary investigation of the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Ecological Analysts, Inc., in November 1983;

 

An evaluation of the status of groundwater contamination near the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Paul A. Rubin in September 1984; and

 

A study of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis in relation to Mathew Creek which was completed by the NYS DEC in July 1987.

The sanitary landfill study evaluated if past disposal activities at the landfill had resulted in groundwater contamination in the area and if this contamination was affecting water quality in the City of Johnstown's public water supply wells, southeast of the site. The study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek investigated the effects of leachate discharge from the landfill on fish and other organisms; findings of this study indicated that water quality in the upper reaches of the creek were toxic to fish, however, it was not concluded if fish mortality was due to naturally occurring poor water quality conditions or site contaminants. The methane migration study evaluated the potential for explosive levels of methane to migrate off-site; findings of this study indicated that elevated levels of methane were detected on private property northeast of the landfill. The preliminary investigation and study of groundwater contamination included installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells at the landfill; additionally, surface water sampling was conducted at selected locations along Mathew Creek. The investigation of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis evaluated water quality in Mathew Creek.

On May 5, 1983, representatives of Ecological Analysts, Inc., a consultant for the NYS DEC, conducted a site inspection of the Johnstown City Landfill. During this site inspection, the location and condition of existing on-site monitoring wells was noted. An extensive sand and gravel mining operation was observed northwest of the active portion of the landfill and groundwater seeps were observed along the southwest face of the excavation. Several empty 55-gallon drums and 10,000 gallon tanks were observed near the base of the south landfill slope; in addition, a leachate seep was also observed in this area. In the sand and gravel pit on the south side of the landfill, open water had collected and a large quantity of sludge-like material was floating on the surface of this standing water. Household wastes were scattered along the eastern side of the landfill face.

 

On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), also known as Superfund, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the NYS DEC. In 1988, the City of Johnstown, entered into a Consent Order with the NYS DEC to conduct a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) at the site. Landfill operations ceased in June 1989.

 

In June 1989, the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In the preliminary health assessment, inhalation of contaminated dust and particulates as well as dermal contact with contaminated surface water, groundwater and soils were identified as the potential human exposure routes of concern for on-site workers. Potential human exposure routes of concern identified for off-site receptors included ingestion of contaminated groundwater and dermal contact with contaminated surface water and soils. In the preliminary health assessment, it was concluded that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and determined that the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells was the most significant public health concern. Further characterization of the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater at the site was recommended.

 

The RI was conducted in multiple phases between June 1989 and March 1992. The first phase of the RI was conducted between June 1989 and June 1990; the second phase of the RI was completed between July 1990 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments and air as well as studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. Ecological studies in Halls Brook and Mathew Creek were also conducted as part of the RI, as well as delineation of wetlands near Mathew Creek. Findings of the RI indicated that 34 acres of the 68-acre site consist of mixed municipal wastes buried at depths ranging from 29.5 feet to 32 feet below surface. Scrap animal hides were found in several of the test pits confirming past disposal of tannery wastes at the landfill.

 

As part of the FS for the site, several clean-up alternatives were evaluated. The preferred remedy for the site includes:

 

Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit and placing excavated materials on the existing landfill (the gravel pit will be backfilled with clean fill);

 

Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound to isolate wastes from rainfall and human contact;

 

Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to homes near the landfill to replace existing water supplies which may be affected by landfill contaminants migrating off-site in groundwater;

 

Installation of a security fence around the landfill mound;

 

Institution of land-use restrictions; and

 

Environmental monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the remedial measures, including long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments.

The provisions for capping include measures to control and monitor methane migration. The preferred remedy also includes provisions to reevaluate groundwater remediation in the event that monitoring results indicate that groundwater and surface water quality are not being restored to acceptable levels through natural attenuation as a result of reduced leachate generation. If groundwater remediation does occur in the future, it would include the extraction of groundwater using wells and submersible pumps with on-site treatment to remove metals and volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), with discharge of the treated water to the aquifer or to a stream. A record of decision (ROD) supporting implementation of this preferred remedy was finalized by US EPA in March 1993. Currently, design of the selected remedy is underway.

 

B. Actions Completed During the Public Health Assessment Process

 

In May of 1977, the NYS DOH expressed concern about landfilling practices at the Johnstown City Landfill and the possible effects of groundwater contamination associated with continued use of the Maple Avenue water supply wells, southeast of the site. NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that water samples from the City water supply wells on Maple Avenue be collected every six months and analyzed for chromium to ensure that users of the water supply were not exposed to unacceptable levels. In 1977, the NYS DOH also recommended to the City Council that consumers who received drinking water from the Maple Avenue wells for prolonged periods of time be advised of the high sodium content.

 

Because of concerns with continued degradation of the water quality in two City water supply wells on Maple Avenue, the NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that the City's long range water supply planning should consider alternate water sources. The City of Johnstown was advised to limit use of the Maple Avenue wells, except during emergencies. The City was also advised to continue to purchase water from the City of Gloversville to supplement their water supply and to initiate development of a new water source.

 

The City of Johnstown public water supply wells on Maple Avenue (wells 1 and 2), south of the landfill, were not used after October 1980 and the wells were permanently taken out of service (i.e., the pumps were removed) in the mid-1980's.

 

Representatives of NYS DOH as well as consultants working for the potentially responsible parties (PRP's) have conducted sampling of residential and other private water supplies near the Johnstown City Landfill as part of past investigatory activities at the site. NYS DOH has provided property owners and residents with copies of the analytical results as well as an explanation of the findings of their water sample results.

 

During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. On May 17, 1989, a public meeting was held to present the draft workplan for investigation of the landfill and proposed sampling of 18 residential wells near the site. In June 1990, a public meeting was held to present findings of the first phase of the RI and present plans for the second phase of the RI. The most recent public meeting was held on February 10, 1993, to present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill.

 

The landfill was closed in June 1989 and vehicular access to the site has been restricted by a locked gate across the access road at the main entrance.

 

Community outreach and community education has been conducted in the past by NYS DEC, NYS DOH and US EPA. Informational materials have been provided to the public about ongoing and proposed activities at the site throughout the RI/FS process. Information repositories have been established at numerous locations including the NYS DEC and US EPA regional offices, the Johnstown Public Library and the Johnstown City Attorney's office. These repositories contain technical, factual and other information related to the site and are available for public reference.

 

The only residential well which showed contamination above NYS DOH drinking water standards was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980. The water supply well at this property was properly abandoned and the house remains vacant.

C. Site Visit

 

On October 22, 1986, Mr. Gary Litwin of the NYS DOH met with representatives of the City of Johnstown, NYS DEC and a citizens action group known as Rainbow Alliance for a Cleaner Environment (RACE). The purpose of the site visit was to observe and evaluate the effect of chromium sludge deposits which had eroded from the landfill on to an adjacent residential property. Following this site visit, NYS DEC expressed concern about the quality of water that had ponded in the gravel pit; Mr. Litwin of the NYS DOH, expressed concern that leachate seeps from the landfill had eroded a gully, exposing municipal refuse and sludge. Furthermore, the leachate seeps were flowing off-site to a small pond through an area which, at the time, was frequently used by off-road vehicles. Mr. Litwin also reported that direct contact with this leachate was occurring and that past sampling of the leachate by NYS DEC showed high levels of chromium, lead and cadmium. Based on the findings of this site investigation, NYS DOH recommended to the NYS DEC that measures be taken to prevent further off-site migration of leachate and prevent direct contact with exposed wastes and contaminated soil. Additionally, NYS DOH recommended that sampling of surface water and sediment be conducted in the pond. 

 

Over the past several years, numerous site visits to the Johnstown City Landfill have been conducted by NYS DOH staff, including Richard Fedigan, Gary Litwin and Claudine Jones Rafferty. Representatives of various other agencies, including US EPA, NYS DEC and the NYS DOH Amsterdam District Office were also present during many of these site visits. The purpose of these visits included sampling of groundwater and investigating site conditions. Past site visits have shown little evidence of trespassers. The most recent site visit was conducted by Claudine Jones Rafferty of the NYS DOH on February 10, 1993. The purpose of this site visit was to evaluate current demographics and the environmental setting surrounding the site. Access onto the landfill proper was not made during this site visit, due to adverse weather conditions and deep snow. Site conditions are not known to have changed since this site visit was conducted.

 

D. Demographics, Land Use, and Natural Resource Use

 

Demographics

 

The Johnstown City Landfill is about two miles northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. In general, the area surrounding the landfill is sparsely populated. However, there are about 80 private residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension, Johnstown Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension.

 

NYS DOH estimated, from the 1990 Census, that 525 people live within 1 mile of the Johnstown City Landfill. The ethnic distribution of the population within 1 mile of the site is 100 percent white. The site is within census tract 9906.00; in this census tract, 5.3 percent of the population is under 5 years of age, 22.6 percent is 5-19 years of age, 56.5 percent is 20-64 years of age and 15.6 percent is 65 years or older. The median household income in 1989 for this census tract was $27,189, with 5 percent of the families with income below the poverty level.

 

Land Use

 

Land use in the area surrounding the landfill is mixed and includes residential, agricultural and recreational development. The area immediately north of the site is part of a State reforestation area and residential density in this area is low. Open fields exist to the south and west and mixed woodlands exist between the landfill and the agricultural areas to the south and also along the eastern site boundary. The two nearest residential properties border the northern site boundary.

 

There are several sand and gravel operations in the Johnstown area including the LaGrange Gravel Pit, just east of the site, and the former sand and gravel operation on-site.

 

Natural Resource Use

 

Surface Water

 

The Johnstown City Landfill is situated south of a major drainage divide that bisects Fulton County. In general, surface water drainage is to the southeast near the site. Mathew Creek is the primary surface water feature near the site (refer to Figure 2, Appendix A) and is classified by the NYS DEC as a "Class A" surface water body, which is designated as a source of water supply for drinking, cooking, recreation and fishing. The headwaters of Mathew Creek, known as LaGrange Springs, are about 1,100 feet southeast of the site. The presence of LaGrange Springs and Mathew Creek is attributed to the intersection of the groundwater table with the ground surface (TWM Northeast, 1992). Mathew Creek flows through Hulbert's Pond and converges with Halls Brook to the southeast before discharging to Cayadutta Creek, which ultimately drains to the Mohawk River. A privately owned, manmade pond, known as Hulberts Pond, has been developed along Mathew Creek, just east of the intersection of Hulbert Road and O'Neil Avenue Extension. Hulberts Pond was stocked with fish in the past, however, a fishkill in this pond was reported in June 1984 and it is not known if Hulberts Pond is currently used for fishing or other recreational activities. LaGrange Gravel Pit, which issituated east of the landfill boundary, is not classified by the NYS DEC as a surface water body. 

 

Groundwater

 

Local groundwater near the site occurs as a result of precipitation that percolates through surficial soils and unconsolidated deposits to the underlying bedrock (TWM Northeast, 1992). In general, groundwater in the overburden deposits flows from areas north and northwest of the landfill towards LaGrange Springs and Matthew Creek, south of the site. Groundwater flow in the bedrock aquifer is from west to east near the site. Groundwater flow directions do not appear to be affected by seasonal fluctuations in groundwater levels.

 

Groundwater near the site is used as a drinking water supply at private residences as well as for agricultural purposes at nearby farms, including a dairy farm operation. There are about 80 residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension; the nearest homes border the site perimeter to the north, along West Fulton Street Extension. The homes along O'Neil Avenue Extension are about one mile south of the site and the homes along Johnstown Avenue Extension are about one half mile to one mile east and southeast of the site. Most of these homes rely on groundwater for drinking and other household uses. Prior to 1980, the City of Johnstown also used groundwater in the area near the landfill as a source for the public water supply. Two former City water supply wells (wells 1 and 2, also known as the Maple Avenue wells) are about 5,000 feet southeast of the landfill (refer to Figures 5 and 11, Appendix A). These wells were installed in 1965 to supplement the existing main source of water (Cork Center Reservoir) for the City's public water supply. Groundwater from the Maple Avenue Wells was pumped to the Maylender Reservoir for storage prior to distribution. The only treatment that this water received was disinfection (i.e., chlorination). These two wells were intended to provide about 1 million gallons per day (mgd) of water and served about 10,000 people. However, due to natural water quality degradation in the Maple Avenue Wellfield between 1965 and 1977, use of these wells gradually declined during the mid to late 1970's. Average water use of the City water supply was about 2.85 mgd. These wells have not been used since 1980 and were permanently taken out of service in the mid-1980's.

 

E. Health Outcome Data

 

The NYS DOH maintains several health outcome data bases which could be used to generate site-specific data, if warranted. These data bases include the cancer registry, the congenital malformations registry, the heavy metals registry, the occupational lung disease registry, vital records (birth and death certificates) and hospital discharge information.

 

COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS

 

In August and September of 1977, the NYS DOH received numerous complaints about the taste and odor of drinking water as well as possible illness by users of the public water supply served by the Maple Avenue wells.

 

In November 1977, a private well serving a residence about 1 mile southeast of the Johnstown City Landfill was sampled by the NYS DOH. With the exception of lead, which was reported at 0.1 milligrams per liter (mg/L), all parameters were within normal ranges. The reported lead concentration exceeded the existing NYS DOH maximum contaminant level (MCL) in effect at that time (0.05 mg/L) for public water supplies. The residents using this water supply as well as members of the community expressed concern about the possible health effects from exposure to elevated lead in drinking water.

 

In 1978, a nearby resident reported to the NYS DEC that fish were not surviving in Hulbert's Pond. This resident attributed the poor fish survival to landfill leachate discharging into surface waters upstream of Hulbert's Pond. 

 

In March 1979, a resident living north of the Johnstown City Landfill reported to the NYS DOH that a significant change in his drinking water supply had occurred and expressed concern about the proximity of the landfill to affect his water supply.

 

In June 1990, the NYS DEC held a public meeting to present findings of the interim RI/FS report. Following this meeting, one of the citizens provided written comments to the NYS DEC expressing concern about a number of issues related to the potential for chemicals to migrate from the Johnstown City Landfill and contamination of their drinking water.

 

In the fall of 1991, a representative of the Rainbow Alliance for Clean Environment (RACE), expressed concern about the analytical results of a water sample that was collected from a private residence near the Johnstown City Landfill. Specifically, these concerns pertained to ammonia, a compound that was detected in the residents water sample, and the possible health effects from exposure to ammonia in drinking water.

 

During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, NYS DEC and US EPA have participated in numerous public meetings regarding investigation and sampling activities, community and public health concerns and remediation activities at the Johnstown City Landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). Additionally, the community has expressed concern about contamination of surficial waters downgradient of the landfill.

 

On February 10, 1993, US EPA representatives held a public meeting at the Johnstown High School to present the findings of the RI/FS and discuss the proposed measures to remediate the Johnstown City Landfill. Claudine Jones Rafferty and Richard Fedigan of the NYS DOH and representatives of the NYS DEC also attended the meeting. About 50 citizens attended this meeting. The primary community concerns presented at this meeting were associated with initial and long-term costs associated with construction, maintenance and use of the proposed public water distribution system to residents living near the landfill. Concerns about the extent contaminant migration from the landfill and the need for preventative measures to control future contaminant migration were also expressed. No specific health concerns were identified.

 

During public review of the draft public health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill, one citizen expressed concern that the incidence of cancer in the area was high, given the relatively small population.

 

https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/pha.asp?docid=221&pg=1

50. Jones Chemicals, Inc., Livingston, NY

 

The Jones Chemicals, Inc. site is located in Caledonia, New York. A chemical manufacturing plant at the 4210-acre area repackaged chlorine from bulk containers into smaller containers for resale from 1942 to 1960. From 1960 to 1977, Jones Chemicals repackaged chlorinated solvents and petroleum products, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The company stopped repackaging solvents in 1985. The plant now produces sodium hypochlorite (bleach) solutions and sodium bisulfite. It also repackages chlorine, sulfur dioxide, inorganic mineral acids, sodium hypochlorite, ammonium hydroxide, caustic soda and various inorganic water-treatment chemicals. Spills occurred during the transfer and repackaging of many of these chemicals, contaminating soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term soil and groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201302

 

51. Kentucky Avenue Well Field, Chemung, NY

 

The Kentucky Avenue Wellfield (KAW) is part of the EWB public-water supply system. It was constructed in 1962 and provided approximately 10 percent of the potable water produced by the Elmira water Board (EWB) until its closure in 1980 following the discovery of elevated levels of trichloroethylene (TCE).  TCE contamination was first detected in the KAW in May 1980 during an inventory of local wells initiated by the New York Department of Health (NYSDOH). In July 1980, the Chemung County Health Department conducted further groundwater sampling in the area and similarly found elevated levels of TCE in the KAW and several private residences and commercial facilities. As a result of these findings, the EWB closed the KAW in September 1980 and removed it from its other sources of potable water for its users. In 1983, the Site was placed on the federal National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites. Additional sampling conducted by local, state, and federal agencies through 1985 identified TCE contamination throughout the Newtown Creek Aquifer. In March 1985, EPA initiated a removal action for the purpose of providing alternate water supplies to impacted residences not connected to the public water distribution system. Residences whose private wells were found to be contaminated with TCE in excess of the NYSDOH drinking water standards for public water supplies were supplied with bottled water and ultimately connected to the public water supply. 

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202142

 

52. Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc., Suffolk, NY

 

The Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc. (LAI) site is located in Port Jefferson Station, New York. The 126-acre area includes LAI's manufacturing plant, which historically produced titanium sheeting for the aeronautics industry. The LAI facility consists of 10 buildings in the southwestern portion of the property. An abandoned, unlined earthen lagoon that formerly received liquid wastes is west of the buildings. A former drum crushing area is south of the buildings. About 80 acres northeast and east of the LAI facility are referred to as the "Outlying Parcels." They are vacant, wooded areas. Finally, the site also includes a downgradient contaminated groundwater plume. Currently, the LAI facility is not operating, many buildings are vacant, and unused. Past disposal practices resulted in a variety of contaminant releases, including trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), acid wastes, oils, sludge, metals and other plant wastes. Following short-term cleanups to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is now in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201335

 

53. Lehigh Valley Railroad, Genesee, NY

 

The Lehigh Valley Railroad site is located in LeRoy, New York. The area is the location of a chemical spill that resulted from a train derailment in 1970. About 1 ton of cyanide crystals and around 30,000 to 35,000 gallons of trichloroethene (TCE) spilled onto the ground, contaminating soil and groundwater.

 

The site includes portions of Gulf Road, the former railroad bed and the properties next to the railroad crossing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203481

 

 

54. Li Tungsten Corp., Nassau, NY

 

The LI Tungsten Superfund Site is located in the City of Glen Cove, Nassau County, New York. The Site consists of the former Li Tungsten facility property located at 63 Herbhill Road, certain portions of the nearby Captain’s Cove property that were contaminated with radioactive material, and other areas where radiologically contaminated materials associated with the former Li Tungsten facility came to be located, including portions of Glen Cove Creek.  

 

The former Li Tungsten facility is 26 acres and consists of three separate parcels. The 23-acre Captain’s Cove property is bounded by Hempstead Harbor to the west, Garvies Point Preserve to the north, the Glen Cove Anglers’ Club to the east, and Glen Cove Creek to the south. A four-acre wetland makes up a portion of the Captain’s Cove property’s southern boundary with the Creek.

 

The Wah Chang Smelting and Refining Company owned the former Li Tungsten facility from the 1940s to about 1984 and, during that period, a succession of entities, including Teledyne Inc. and the Li Tungsten Corp., operated the facility. Operations generally involved the processing of ore and scrap tungsten concentrates to metal tungsten powder and tungsten carbide powder, although other specialty metal products were also produced. Portions of the Captain’s Cove property were used as a dumpsite for a variety of wastes, including the disposal of spent ore residuals by the operators of the former Li Tungsten facility. The Glen Cove Development Corporation (GCDC) acquired the Li Tungsten facility property in 1984 and leased it to the Li Tungsten Corporation, which declared bankruptcy in 1985 and ceased operations.

 

Glen Cove Creek is a 1.0 mile federal navigation channel that is maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers.  It extends from Hempstead Harbor easterly to the head of navigation at Charles Street near the municipal center of Glen Cove. During routine maintenance dredging in 2001, the Corps discovered the presence of radioactive materials in Glen Cove Creek, which led to the indefinite suspension of the dredging program and the inclusion of the creek as part of the Li Tungsten Superfund Site.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202972

55. Liberty Industrial Finishing, Nassau, NY

 

he Liberty Industrial Finishing site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During World War II and the Korean War, industrial operations at the 30-acre site included aircraft parts manufacturing and associated metal finishing processes largely in support of military efforts. After the wars, the site was used for other industrial and warehousing operations. During these operations, wastes were discharged into below-grade sumps, underground leaching chambers and unlined groundwater recharge basins or lagoons. These operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and vapor monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201184

56. Little Valley, Cattaraugus, NY

 

The Little Valley Superfund site is comprised of a plume of trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater that extends approximately eight miles southeastward from the Village of Little Valley to the northern edge of the City of Salamanca, which is part of the Allegheny Indian Reservation, in Cattauragus County, New York.  The site is located in a rural, agricultural area with a number of small, active and inactive industries and more than 200 residential properties situated along Route 353, the main transportation route between Little Valley and the City of the Salamanca. 

 

In 1982, the Cattaraugus County Health Department (CCHD) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), while investigating TCE contamination in the vicinity of a small manufacturing facility on Route 353, detected TCE in nearby private wells.  NYSDEC installed a number of monitoring wells in the area to investigate possible sources of the contamination, including a former drum storage area, a private disposal site next to the former drum storage area, an inactive municipal landfill which accepted industrial wastes, and industrial facilities.

 

Following the installation of treatment systems on private wells, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place, which consisted of a soil remediation, a long-term groundwater monitoring program, and an evaluation of the potential for soil vapor intrusion into structures within the study area and mitigation, if necessary.    

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204016

57. Ludlow Sand & Gravel, Oneida, NY (REMOVED)

 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting its fourth five-year review of the

Ludlow Sand and Gravel Superfund Site, located in the town of Paris, Oneida County, New York.

This review seeks to confirm that the cleanup conducted at the site, which included removal of

contaminated soil and sediments, placement of a cap over the landfill at the site, solidification of

deeper contaminated soil and ground water monitoring, continues to protect human health and the

environment.

Although the Ludlow Sand and Gravel site was deleted from the National Priorities List in December

2013, five-year reviews will continue as needed. A summary of cleanup activities and an evaluation of

the protectiveness of the implemented remedy will be included in the five-year review report.   

 

http://town.paris.ny.us/content/News/View/31:field=documents;/content/Documents/File/72.pdf 

 

58. MacKenzie Chemical Works, Inc. Suffolk, NY

 

The MacKenzie Chemical Works site is located in Central Islip, New York. The site property was used from 1948 to 1987 for the manufacture of various chemical products, including fuel additives and metal acetylacetonates. According to the Suffolk County Department of Health Services, MacKenzie stored 1, 2, 3-trichloropropane in three 10,000-gallon tanks on site. Other historical waste sources include other storage tanks, leaking drums, waste lagoons, cesspools and stormwater drywells. Spills, explosions and fires have occurred at the facility, including a methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) spill in 1977, a nitrous oxide release in 1978 and an MEK spill/fire in 1979. The site’s long-term remedy is in place. Soil and groundwater treatment are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202187

 

59. Malta Rocket Fuel Area, Saratoga, NY

 

The Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is located in the towns of Malta and Stillwater, in Saratoga County, New York. The site consists of the 165-acre former Malta Test Station and undeveloped forest that forms part of the safety easement for the Test Station. The U.S. government established the Test Station in 1945 for rocket engine and fuel testing. Research and development activities at the Test Station continued until 1984.

 

Operations at the site involved the use of hazardous substances, which resulted in surface water and groundwater becoming contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride (carbon tet), and contaminating the site soil with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The cleanup at the site has been completed and included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and debris and treatment of the water supply.  The long-term cleanup remedy also includes ongoing surface water monitoring and periodic monitoring of groundwater.

 

Active redevelopment of the site is underway. In 2009, the Saratoga Economic Development Corporation began the first phase of the construction of the Luther Forest Technology Campus. GLOBALFOUNDRIES U.S., Inc., the first tenant at the Luther Forest Technology Campus, has already redeveloped a portion of the site. Eventually, the entire Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is expected to be encompassed by the technology campus.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=020208

60. Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc., Nassau, NY

 

The Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc. site is located in Glen Cove, New York. The 2.5-acre area is an inactive chemical distribution facility. From the mid-1960s until 1987, Mattiace received chemicals by tank truck and redistributed them to its customers. The company also operated the M&M Drum Cleaning Company on site until 1982. During this time, a Quonset hut, shed, concrete loading dock and about 56 storage tanks were located on site. In 1988, EPA undertook an emergency action to secure the site and remove more than 100,000 gallons of hazardous liquids. Construction of the site’s long-term soil and groundwater remedy as described in the 1991 Record of Decision (ROD) finished in 1998. The treatment system operated for approximately 16 years before a ROD Amendment was signed in September 2014 changing the remedy. The amended remedy is currently in the design phase with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin in summer 2016.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201219

 

 

61. Mercury Refining, Inc., Albany, NY

 

The Mercury Refining, Inc. site is located on the border of the towns of Guilderland and Colonie, New York. From 1955 to 1998, Mercury Refining Company, Inc. (MERECO) used the half-acre area for reclaiming mercury from batteries and other mercury-bearing materials. Facility operations contaminated soils, groundwater and sediments in a tributary of Patroon Creek with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury.

 

Cleanup at the site was completed in 2014. Long-term groundwater and ecological monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201552

62. Mohonk Road Industrial Plant, Ulster, NY

 

The Mohonk Road Industrial Plant site is located in High Falls, New York. From the early 1960s through the 1970s, industrial operations at the 14.5-acre area included metal finishing, wet spray painting and fixture manufacturing. All of these operations required the use of solvents. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA developed the site’s long-term remedy. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203945

 

63. Nepera Chemical Co., Inc., Orange, NY

 

The Nepera Chemical Company site is located in Hamptonburgh, New York. The site is a 29-acre former industrial waste disposal facility. Between 1953 and 1967, lagoons at the site received about 50,000 gallons of wastewater per day from the Nepera chemical plant in Harriman, New York. Nepera made a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial chemicals. State inspectors detected leaks from the lagoons in 1958 and 1960, and operations ended in December 1967. The company’s operations contaminated soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

29https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201188

 

64. Niagara Mohawk Power Co. (Saratoga Springs,) Saratoga, NY

 

The Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. (NMPC) (Saratoga Springs Plant) site is located in Saratoga Springs, New York. The site includes a 7-acre parcel (the NMPC Property), the former skating rink property (a 2.3-acre property formerly owned by the City of Saratoga Springs), and portions of Spring Run Creek. The Saratoga Gas Light Company, a predecessor company of Niagara Mohawk, used the NMPC property for coal gas manufacturing. Various other companies then used the property from 1853 until the late 1940s. Byproduct materials containing hazardous substances were disposed of at various locations at the NMPC property. The property's subsurface contains coal tar waste deposits from these operations. Niagara Mohawk operated the site from 1950 to 1999 as a district service center and headquarters for its electric line, natural gas, vehicle and equipment repair, maintenance, storage facilities, and tree trimming crews servicing the Saratoga District. The site’s long-term cleanup and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202182

 

 

65. Old Bethpage Landfill, Nassau, NY

 

he Old Bethpage Landfill site is located in Old Bethpage, New York. The Town of Oyster Bay operated the 65-acre landfill from 1957 to 1986. In addition to municipal wastes and garbage, industrial wastes from local industries were also disposed in the landfill in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Landfill operations contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring at the site are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201951

 

 

66. Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Nassau, NY

 

The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area site is located in Garden City, New York. Two Garden City public drinking water supply wells at the site have been found to be contaminated with the chlorinated solvents tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The site includes the former Roosevelt Field airfield.

 

Chlorinated solvents such as TCE and PCE have been widely used for aircraft manufacturing, maintenance and repair operations since the 1930s. The site is now the location of a shopping mall, office buildings, parking areas and Hazelhurst Park. Nassau County conducts regular well sampling and analysis of the public supply wells, and EPA is addressing site cleanup through federal actions. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204234

 

67. Olean Well Field, Cattaraugus, NY

 

The Olean Well Field is located in Olean, New York. The 1.5-square-mile area includes three public and 50 private wells contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE). Much of the groundwater contamination is believed to be the result of industrial operations at several nearby commercial establishments. Contamination was discovered in 1981. Use of the public wells was discontinued after detection of the TCE and an old surface water filtration plant was reactivated to provide water to city residents. In 1990, the public wells were reactivated after two air strippers were installed to treat the groundwater. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and long-term cleanup efforts are ongoing.

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201877

 

68. Pasley Solvents & Chemicals, Inc., Nassau, NY

 

The Pasley Solvents and Chemicals site is located in the Town of Hempstead, Nassau County  New York. The 75-foot-by-275-foot area is a former tank farm used for the storage of oils, solvents and chemicals. Poor waste handling and storage practices resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater on and off the site property with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2011. A police station is currently located on site.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202422

 

 

69. Peninsula Boulevard Ground Water Plume, Nassau, NY

 

The Peninsula Boulevard Groundwater Plume site is a tetrachloroethylene (PCE or perc) groundwater plume in Hewlett, New York. Its source is unknown. The groundwater flows toward the northwest, in the direction of the Long Island American Water Plant 5 Well Field, a source of drinking water. Since April 1991, the Plant 5 well water has been treated by a packed tower aeration system, also known as an air stripper. Remedial design for the site’s groundwater treatment system is underway. EPA is also assessing the site’s source areas.

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204407

70. Peter Cooper Landfill, Cattaraugus, NY

 

The Peter Cooper site is located in Gowanda, New York. The site was the location of an animal glue and industrial adhesive manufacturing factory. The site’s remedy includes an immediate response to address the source area (the landfill) and long-term cleanup focused on containment of the source and addressing exposure pathways outside the source area. A retaining wall prevents contaminants from reaching Cattaraugus Creek. Past disposal practices, including piling the sludge waste remaining after the animal glue manufacturing process on the northwest portion of the site led to the contamination of the soil. These wastes, known as “cookhouse sludge” because of a cooking cycle that occurred just prior to extraction of the glue, are derived primarily from chrome-tanned hides obtained from tanneries. The waste material has been shown to contain elevated levels of chromium, arsenic, zinc, and several organic compounds. After initial actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and cleanup were completed.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201887

71. Peter Cooper Corporation (Markhams,) Cattaraugus, NY

 

The Peter Cooper Corporation site is located in Dayton, New York. The 106-acre site was an industrial waste disposal area for the Peter Cooper Corporation (PCC), a former animal glue and adhesives plant in Gowanda, New York. The wastes contaminated soil, leachate and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Contaminants found on site included sludges that contained arsenic, metals and organic compounds. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202124

 

72. Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Clinton, NY

 

The 3,440-acre former Plattsburgh Air Force Base is located in Plattsburgh, New York. The site is located in a mixed use area consisting of industrial and commercial enterprises, as well as private residences. It is bordered on the north by the Saranac River and the city of Plattsburgh, and on the south by the Salmon River. Lake Champlain, located east of the base, forms approximately one mile of the base boundary.

 

The base began operations in 1955 as a Tactical Wing under the Strategic Air Command of the United States Air Force. It continued operations under that mission until 1991, when it was reassigned as an Air Refueling Wing. The base closed under the Department of Defense (DoD) Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program in 1995. Prior to construction of the Air Force Base, the area occupied by the former base was used by various components of the U.S. military dating back to the Civil War. A history of the site is available on the Plattsburgh Airbase Redevelopment Corporation’s (PARC’s) website at http://www.parc-usa.com.  

 

Former Air Force base operations, including aircraft operation, testing and maintenance, firefighting exercises, the discharge of munitions, and landfill operations, generated hazardous wastes that contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater.  Cleanup has been ongoing since the 1980’s and is nearly complete.  Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202439

 

73. Pollution Abatement Services, Oswego, NY

 

The Pollution Abatement Services (PAS) site is located in Oswego, New York.  The PAS facility, a high-temperature, liquid chemical waste, incineration facility, operated on the 15.5-acre property from 1970 to 1977.  

 

The facility experienced operational problems and was cited for numerous air and water quality violations by state and federal agencies.  Because the incinerator never operated properly, more than 10,000 leaking and deteriorating accumulated on-site, more than a million gallons of oil and mixed hydrocarbons accumulated in three lagoons and contaminated waste oil accumulated in several aboveground and underground storage tanks.  As a result, the site soil and groundwater were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the sediments in the adjacent White and Wine Creeks, which flow into Lake Ontario, were contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

 

The facility was closed in 1977 and the site has been remediated

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201196

 

 

74. Port Washington Landfill Nassau, NY

 

The Port Washington Landfill site is located in North Hempstead, New York. The 54-acre area is part of a municipal landfill. The area was a disposal area for construction debris. In 1973, the Town of North Hempstead purchased it and operated a municipal landfill until closing the facility in 1983. Operation of the landfill resulted in an off-site soil gas plume composed of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202155

 

75. Preferred Plating Corp., Suffolk NY

 

Conditions at proposal (October 15, 1984): Preferred Plating Corp. conducted plating operations on a

0.5-acre site in Farmingdale, Town of Babylon, Suffolk County, New York, for more than 20 years, before

going out of business in 1976. Since then, several firms have occupied the site. None conducted similar

operations to Preferred Plating. An automobile repair shop now occupies the site.

From 1955 to 1976, the Suffolk County Department of Health made numerous tests of waste materials

contained in open pits. The pits were severely cracked and leaking, allowing discharges into ground water.

In 1975, the county identified four major contaminants--copper, chromium, cadmium, and hexavalent

chromium. About 15,000 people draw drinking water from wells within 3 miles of the site.

The county has taken various court actions through the years to upgrade on-site treatment facilities. The

court mandates were never accomplished. In 1976, Preferred Plating filed for bankruptcy.

Status (June 10, 1986): EPA is considering various alternatives for this site.

For more information about the hazardous substances identified in this narrative summary, including

general information regarding the effects of exposure to these substances on human health, please see

the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) ToxFAQs. ATSDR ToxFAQs can be

found on the Internet at ATSDR - ToxFAQs (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/index.asp) or by telephone

at 1-888-42-ATSDR or 1-888-422-8737.

 

https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/363587.pdf

 

76. Ramapo Landfill Rockland, NY

 

The Ramapo Landfill site is located in Ramapo, New York. The 96-acre landfill opened in 1972. In 1978, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) denied the landfill operators an operating permit because of an incomplete permit application and violations of state codes. In addition, unauthorized dumping may have occurred at the landfill. Landfill operations contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater with hazardous chemicals.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201191

77. Richardson Hill Road Landfill/Pond, Delaware, NY

 

The Richardson Hill Road Landfill site is located in Sidney and Masonville, New York. The landfill accepted municipal waste and spent oils from the Scintilla Division of Bendix Corporation (predecessor to Honeywell International, Inc. and Amphenol Corp.) from 1964 to 1969. Landfill operations contaminated soils, sediment, and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site consists of two sections–the South Area and the North Area. The South Area contains an 8-acre landfill, South Pond and Herrick Hollow Creek. The North Area includes two small disposal trenches and a manmade surface water body called North Pond. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the long-term groundwater collection and treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201770

 

 

78. Robintech, Inc./National Pipe Co., Broome, NY

The Robintech Inc./National Pipe Co. site is located in Vestal, New York. The 12-acre site is an active manufacturing facility. The site property was owned by Robinson Technical Products from 1966 to 1970, Robintech, Inc. from 1970 to 1982, and the Buffton Corporation from 1982 to 2006 (Buffton Corporation changed its name to BFX Hospitality, Inc. in 1996). The site is currently occupied by National Pipe and Plastics, which manufactures polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe from inert PVC resin on site. Facility operations contaminated soils and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201452

 

79. Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump, Cortland, NY

 

The Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard Dump is an abandoned scrap-metal processing facility which occupies approximately 20 acres on the southern side of the City of Cortland, New York. The site is surrounded by commercial, residential, and industrial properties. The site overlies the Cortland-Homer-Preble aquifer, a sole source aquifer used as a supply of potable water for the City of Cortland. The supply well for the city is located two miles upgradient of the site. The area currently occupied by the site is the eastern half of a forty-acre parcel of land that in the late 1800s was developed by the Wickwire Brothers, Inc. as an industrial facility for the manufacture of wire, wire products, insect screens, poultry netting, and nails. The eastern half of the property was used primarily as a scrap yard. An on-site pond was used as a cooling pond. The facility was sold to the Keystone Consolidated Industries, Inc in 1968. Keystone closed the facility in 1971, and shortly thereafter, the facility was destroyed by fire. In the early 1970s, Phillip and Harvey Rosen transferred their existing scrap-metal processing operation to the eastern portion of the property. The Rosen Brothers demolished the Wickwire buildings and used the debris to fill in most of the cooling pond. The area where the demolition of the buildings took place was cleared for the development of new industry in 1979, known as the Noss Industrial Park. Rosen Brothers' scrap metal operations included scrap metal processing and automobile crushing. Municipal waste, industrial waste and construction waste were allegedly intermittently disposed of in or on the former cooling pond. Drums were crushed on-site, the contents spilling onto the ground surface. The Rosen brothers were cited for various violations, including illegally dumping into Perplexity Creek Tributary, improperly disposing of waste materials, and operating a refuse disposal area without a permit. Operations on the site cease in 198 5, and the site was abandoned. In 1986, the State conducted an investigation of the site and concluded that hazardous materials were present on the site, including several hundred full and/or leaking drums, transformers filled with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pressurized cylinders of unknown contents. Elevated levels of trichloroethane (TCA), PCBs, anthracene, pyrene, lead, and chromium, in site soil, sediment, and groundwater were detected. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a removal action in 1987. EPA also issued Administrative Orders to Keystone and several additional potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in 1988 and 1989, requiring them to remove the materials previously staged by EPA. This work was completed in April 1990. The site was added to the National Priorities List in March 1989. PRPs conducted a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) from January 1990 to 1997. The PRPs also voluntarily demolished and removed buildings and a smoke stack; removed and recycled 200 tons of scrap materials; emptied and disposed of contents of an abandoned underground storage tank and removed a small concrete oil pit. In August 1997, the EPA removed and recycled over 500 tons of scrap metal and more than 20 tons of tires form the site. A Unilateral Administrative Order was issued in February 1990 and also in March 1998, which required PRPs to perform a removal action. A Record of Decision (ROD) was issued in March 1998.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202609

80. Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination, Suffolk, NY

 

The Rowe Industries site is located in Sag Harbor, New York. From the 1950s through the early 1960s, Rowe Industries, Inc. manufactured small electric motors at transformers at the 8-acre area. Solvents stored on the property leaked into the groundwater and formed a 500-foot-wide plume that extended northward to Sag Harbor Creek. Groundwater and soil are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air.

After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Soil cleanup finished in 2003. Contact with contaminated groundwater and soil is no longer a concern. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202330

 

81. Sarney Farm, Dutchess, NY

 

The Sarney Farm site is located in Amenia, New York. A former owner was permitted to use a 5-acre section of the site property as a landfill for municipal wastes. However, industrial and municipal wastes were disposed of at locations across the site from 1965 to 1969. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202088

82. Sealand Restoration, Inc., St. Lawrence, NY

 

The Sealand Restoration, Inc. site is located in Lisbon, New York. A disposal facility for hazardous materials, such as petroleum wastes, operated at the 210-acre area. Groundwater was contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Soils were found to contain low levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, heavy metals and phenols, which are chemicals used to make plastics and detergents. Surface water also was found to be contaminated with metals. Following site investigations, a long-term cleanup remedy was put in place. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202090

83. Shenandoah Road Groundwater Contamination, Dutchess, NY

 

The Shenandoah Road Ground Water Contamination site is located in East Fishkill, New York, in an area known as Shenandoah. The site is an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected residential well drinking water. Tests showed that 60 residential drinking water wells in the area exceeded maximum levels for tetrachloroethene (PCE) and/or trichloroethene (TCE), harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in industrial solvents. PCE is considered a potential human carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the levels detected during testing indicated an immediate threat to public health. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Site cleanup and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204269

 

84. Sidney Landfill, Delaware, NY

 

The Sidney Landfill site is located in Sidney, New York. The 74-acre area includes a 20-acre former landfill. It accepted municipal and commercial waste, including waste oils, from 1964 until 1972. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201764

 

85. Sinclair Refinery, Allegany, NY

 

The 100-acre Sinclair Oil Refinery site is situated between the Genesee River and South Brooklyn Avenue, one-half mile south of downtown Wellsville, in Allegany County, New York.   The northerly flowing Genesee River forms the eastern and southern boundaries of the site, South Brooklyn Avenue forms the western boundary, and an old refinery access road forms the northern boundary.  The site consists of two areas: a 90-acre refinery area and a 10-acre landfill area.

 

After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. A site inspection by EPA, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Atlantic Richfield (ARCO), the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), in June 2012 confirmed that all systems were operating as designed and are protective of human health and the environment.  Environmental easements/restrictive covenants are in place on all the site properties.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202093

 

 

86. Smithtown Ground Water Contamination Suffolk, NY

 

he Smithtown Ground Water Contamination site is located in the villages of Nissequogue and Head of the Harbor, and the hamlet of St. James, on Long Island in eastern New York state. The site consists of an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected local drinking water supplies. Groundwater is contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE), a solvent used in dry cleaning and metal cleaning. EPA connected affected residents to public water supplies and provided bottled water. EPA is also conducting long-term groundwater and surface water monitoring and putting controls in place to restrict the use of contaminated water. During its research, EPA could not identify the source of the contamination or a plume reaching groundwater.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204148

 

87. SMS Instruments, Inc., Suffolk, NY

 

The SMS Instruments site is located in Suffolk County, New York. The site is the location of an active industrial facility that includes a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. The primary operation at the site has been the overhauling of military aircraft components. Overhauling operations include cleaning, painting, degreasing, refurbishing, metal machining and testing. Facility operations contaminated groundwater and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201325

 

 

88. Solvent Savers, Chenango, NY

 

The Solvent Savers site covers 13 acres in Lincklaen, New York. Solvent Savers, Inc. operated a chemical waste recovery facility at the site for reprocessing or disposal of industrial solvents and other wastes from about 1967 to 1974. Operations included distillation to recover solvents for reuse, drum reconditioning, and burial of liquids, solids, sludges and drums in several on-site areas. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediments and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Cleanup activities and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201687

89. Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY

 

The Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination site is located in North Hempstead, New York.

The quarter-acre area includes an active dry-cleaning business and an adjacent one-story boiler/storage building. As a result of past disposal practices, tetrachloroethene (PCE), a volatile organic compound (VOC), migrated from the subsurface soils into the indoor air environments of nearby buildings and the groundwater, resulting in a significant threat to public health. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204167

90. Tri-Cities Barrel Co., Inc., Broome, NY

 

The Tri-Cities Barrel site is located in Fenton, New York. Used drums were reconditioned at the facility. The wastewater from the cleaning of the drums was discharged into unlined lagoons and allowed to evaporate. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201830

 

91. Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1, Broome, NY

 

The Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 site is located in Vestal, New York. Well 1-1 is one of three production wells in Water District 1 intended to provide drinking water to several water districts in the Vestal area. The well is moderately contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The site also originally included Well 4-2 in Water District 4. However, EPA designated this well as a separate Superfund site, the Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site, when sampling indicated that two separate sources contaminated Well 1-1 and Well 4-2. Well 1-1 has pumped groundwater into the Susquehanna River since 1980 to prevent the contaminant plume from affecting other District 1 wells. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. There are currently no human or environmental exposures to contaminated groundwater and soils.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202228

 

92. Volney Municipal Landfill, Oswego, NY

 

The 85-acre Volney Landfill site is located in Volney, New York. Landfilling operations took place at an unlined disposal area on site from 1969 to 1983. The landfill accepted wastes from homes, businesses and light industry. However, from 1974 to 1975, the landfill accepted up to 8,000 barrels containing chemical residues from a local hazardous waste treatment facility. Of these, allegedly 200 barrels contained liquids of unknown volume and composition. Also, from 1976 to 1978, the landfill accepted an industrial sludge, which was later identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste. Oswego County terminated disposal operations at the landfill in 1983 and finished closure of the site in 1985. After investigations, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater and leachate treatment and monitoring are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201836

 

93. Waste Management, Inc Niagara, NY

 

The Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York.  The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill.  The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed.  Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site.  After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded.  The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976.  Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004.  Long-term monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266

 

94. York Oil Co., Franklin, NY

 

The York Oil Co. site is located in Franklin County, New York. The York Oil Company recycled waste oil at this 17-acre area from 1962 until 1975. Facility operators collected crankcase and industrial oils, some containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from sources in New England and New York. They stored or processed the oils at the site. The recycled PCB-contaminated oil was sold as No. 2 fuel oil or used in dust control for unpaved roads nearby. During heavy rains and spring thaws, the oil-water mixture in the lagoons would often overflow onto surrounding lands and into adjacent wetlands, which the company purchased in 1964. A state road crew first reported contamination at the site in 1979. After emergency actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201202

 

95. Action Anodizing, Plating, & Polishing Corp., Suffolk, NY

 

The Action Anodizing, Plating, and Polishing Corp. (AAPP) site is located in Copiague, New York. Since 1968, AAPP has been the sole operator at the 1-acre site. AAPP’s operations primarily involved sulfuric acid anodizing of aluminum parts for the electronics industry, cadmium plating, chromate conversion coatings, metal dyeing and vapor degreasing. During a site inspection in January 1980 by the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS), it was discovered that rinse water from AAPP’s operations was discharging directly into underground leaching pits. Under the direction and approval of the SCDHS in 1980, AAPP excavated the pits and backfilled them with clean sand and gravel. In 1985, AAPP expanded its building over the location of the former leaching pits. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202634

 

96. Anchor Chemicals, Nassau, NY

 

The Anchor Chemicals site is located in Hicksville, New York. Chemical blending and packaging operations there led to soil and ground water contamination. In 1995, a short-term cleanup called a removal action dug up and removed about 21 tons of contaminated sediments from four dry wells. Ground water sampling in 1996 and 1997 confirmed that the site no longer poses an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in 1999.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201324

97. Batavia Landfill, Orleans, NY

 

The Batavia Landfill site is located in Genesee County, New York. From the 1960s until 1980, several operations dumped industrial wastes at the 35-acre landfill, contaminating soils, sediment, surface water and groundwater with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Cleanup has included consolidation of contaminated soils and wastes under a multi-layered landfill, collection and off-site disposal of leachate, wetlands restoration and groundwater monitoring. Long-term operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in November 2005.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201766

98. BEC Trucking, Broome, NY

 

The BEC Trucking site is located on Stewart Road in Vestal, New York. In the mid-1960s, a trucking company filled in 3.5 acres of marshland with various materials to raise the ground level. BEC Trucking used the property for truck body manufacturing, painting and vehicle maintenance. These operations generated hazardous wastes, which were stored on-site. To clean up the site, the property owner removed waste drums and placed stained soil in storage drums, which the EPA later removed. No other cleanup actions were required. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 1992.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202235

99. BioClinical Laboratories, Inc., Suffolk, NY

 

he Bioclinical Laboratories, Inc. (BCL) site is located in Bohemia, New York. The site is a rental property within a 10-unit, single-story building on a 2.6-acre paved lot. BCL formulated, mixed, repackaged and distributed chemicals there from 1978 to 1981. Sampling found a range of organic contaminants, including solvents, in the facility’s sanitary systems. In July 1981, a fire destroyed much of BCL's inventory. Following removal of fire-damaged containers and industrial wastes from the facility’s sanitary systems, EPA determined that no further cleanup was required. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1994.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202236

100. C & J Disposal Leasing Co. Dump, Madison, NY

 

The C&J Disposal site is located in the Town of Eaton, Madison County, New York, near the intersection of Routes 12B and 46.  The site included a rectangular disposal trench which measured approximately 140 feet by 40 feet.  The disposal trench was situated between a former railroad bed and an active agricultural field, and was on property immediately adjacent to residential property owned by C&J Leasing of Paterson, New Jersey.  Approximately 100 feet south of where the trench is located is a small pond and adjacent wetlands which drain to Woodman Pond, a back-up water supply for the Village of Hamilton.  There are twelve residences in the vicinity and downgradient of the site which use private wells as their source of drinking water.  

 

During the 1970s, the trench area was used for the disposal of industrial wastes, although never licensed or permitted for that purpose.  In March 1976, C&J Leasing was observed dumping what appeared to be paint sludges and other liquid industrial waste materials into the trench.  An inspection of the site by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the Village of Hamilton engineer revealed approximately 100 drums lying in a pool of liquid waste.  The trench was subsequently covered with fill, reportedly by C&J Leasing, apparently burying the drums observed in March 1976.  

 

Sampling was conducted at the site by NYSDEC in 1985 and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1986.  Surficial soil samples obtained from the site revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, phthalates, various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and lead.  One of the phthalates, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and elevated levels of lead were detected in the sediments of the small pond.  

The site was placed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in March 1989.

 

In April 1989, prior to the start of an EPA remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), the site was subject to an unauthorized excavation by the principals of C&J Leasing, leaving two large holes and three stockpiles of soil and waste material.  The drums that were believed to have been previously buried may have been removed at this time, or earlier, and taken off-site.  An extensive follow-up investigation failed to determine where the drums may have been taken.

The site was cleaned up in 1993 and removed from the NPL in 1994.

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202366

 

101. Clothier Disposal, Oswego, NY

 

The Clothier Disposal site is a 15-acre privately-owned dump site, 6 acres of which were used from the early 1970s to 1984 to dispose of demolition debris, household wastes, junk vehicles, and approximately 2,200 drums of hazardous chemical waste from the Pollution Abatement Services, Inc. (PAS) site, which is also listed on the National Priorities List (NPL).

 

In 1973, the Oswego County Health Department discovered drums containing various amounts of waste from the PAS site at the Clothier Disposal site and reported it to state authorities. In  1976, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) brought a lawsuit against the owner of the property for operating an illegal dump. Subsequently, a temporary permit was granted to clean up the site. From 1977 to 1980, the owner made an attempt to clean up the property. These efforts largely entailed breaking open and draining drums and burying or covering exposed wastes. In 1985, NYSDEC staged and characterized the wastes and drum contents. During these activities, it was discovered that approximately 80 drums were in danger of rupturing; these drums had to be placed in new containers immediately. It was also reported that prior to staging and sampling, up to 90 drums had already ruptured and their contents had leaked onto the ground. The site was listed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) on June 1, 1996. Residents in the area rely on private wells for drinking water. A wetland passes through the site to the west of the area used for waste disposal. Ox Creek flows through the site, feeding into the Oswego River, and a portion of the site is located within a 100-year flood plain. 

 

What is the current site status?

The site was addressed through federal and potentially responsible parties' actions in two stages: initial actions and a long-term remedial action focused on cleanup of the entire site.

 

Initial Actions: During 1986, drums were moved to a centralized on-site location. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs), later removed 1,858 drums of waste. In 1987 and 1988, EPA removed remaining drums and visibly-contaminated soil and debris associated with the drums.

 

Long-term Cleanup: In 1989, a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, was completed.  The RI/FS concluded that as a result of the removal of the drums and associated contaminated soil, only residual contamination remained.  Accordingly, EPA selected a remedy in the site that included regrading and placement of a 1-foot soil cover over residually-contaminated areas and revegetating the site; putting in erosion control measures, as needed, on the embankment sloping toward Ox Creek; institutional controls to prevent the use of the underlying groundwater or any land use involving significant disturbance of the soil cover and long-term ground-water, soil, sediment and surface water monitoring.

 

Following completion of site cleanup activities in 1994, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996

 

What's being done to protect human health and the environment?

Grading activities for the soil cover uncovered seven drums. The drums and surrounding soil were loaded into dumpsters and removed in 1992. Long-term monitoring and inspection of the site, which started in 1994, led to the discovery of three buried drums. The drums were dug up, overpacked and removed from the site. As a precaution, a limited-area geophysical investigation was undertaken to determine the possible presence of other buried drums. This investigation led to the discovery of buried metallic debris, which was subsequently removed from the site.

 

EPA has since finished four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedy is protect public health and the environment and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in March 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment.

 

Groundwater samples collected in 2014 indicated that the groundwater now meets cleanup standards.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/CurSites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0201192

102. Conklin Dumps, Broome, NY

 

The Conklin Dumps site originally consisted of two landfilled areas totaling about 37 acres, referred to as the "Upper Landfill" and the "Lower Landfill." It is believed that only municipal solid waste was disposed of in the Lower Landfill, which was operated between 1964 and 1969. The Lower Landfill contained approximately 33,000 cubic yards of wastes before it was excavated and consolidated with the Upper Landfill in 1993. The Upper Landfill contained approximately 72,000 cubic yards of waste before it was consolidated with the Lower Landfill. It is believed that some industrial wastes were co-disposed with municipal solid wastes in the Upper Landfill. Testing conducted by Broome County found the ground water to be contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Leachate from the site drains into Carlin Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River. Approximately 700 people live within 1 mile of the site. The closest residents live 1/4 mile from the Upper Landfill's boundary. Approximately 2,000 people depend on wells within 3 miles of the site for their drinking water. The area immediately surrounding the Upper Landfill is proposed for development as an industrial park. The U.S. Department of the Interior has designated a large wetland on the site as an important biological resource. Site Responsibility: This site was addressed through federal, state, and municipal actions.

 

What is the current site status?

The site was addressed in a single, long-term remedial phase focused on cleanup of the entire site.

 

Long-Term Cleanup: Following a remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s 1991 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included capping the landfills, pumping and collecting leachate, and treating the leachate off site at a publicly owned treatment works. In 1992, EPA updated the remedy to focus on excavation of the Lower Landfill, consolidation of the excavated Lower Landfill contents onto the Upper Landfill, capping of the Upper Landfill, and construction of a leachate collection and treatment system.

 

Following the completion of cleanup activities in 1994, EPA removed the site from the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1997.

 

What's being done to protect human health and the environment?

The Lower Landfill was excavated and placed on the Upper Landfill in 1993. The capping of the Upper Landfill finished in 1994. The cap covers about 37 acres. The installation of a leachate collection system and the construction of a pipeline to convey the collected leachate to a local sewage treatment plant finished in January 1996. To date, about 70,000 gallons of leachate has been collected and sent for treatment at the Binghamton-Johnson City sewage treatment plant in Vestal, New York. An estimated 25,000 gallons of leachate will be collected and treated annually for about 30 years, for a total of 750,000 gallons over the life of the project.

 

EPA has conducted four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedies put in place protect public health and the environment, and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in January 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment in the short term. For the site’s remedy to be protective in the long term, the review recommends on-site institutional controls to restrict activities that could affect the integrity of the cap, prohibit the residential use of the site property, and prohibit the installation of groundwater wells for drinking or irrigation until groundwater standards are achieved.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0202329

103. Hooker (102nd Street,) Niagara, NY

 

The 102nd Street chemical landfill, is a former chemical landfill located on the Niagara River in Niagara Falls, New York. It is almost immediately adjacent to the infamous Love Canal chemical landfill, which are split from each other by the LaSalle Expressway and Frontier Avenue. Hooker Chemical, a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum, and Olin Chemical, who were the original owners of the site, were ordered to clean up the site and pay $16,500,000[1] by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It is a designated Superfund site, and is closed to the public.

 

The 102nd Street landfill consists of two parcels, one owned by Olin Corporation and one owned by Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corporation at an area of 22.1 acres (89,000 m2) total.[2] Unlike Love Canal, which it is directly south of, the facility is still owned by Hooker (Occidental) and Olin, who are in the process of cleaning it up. It is part of the original canal excavation from which the Love Canal landfill takes its name. It currently appears to be a large field, as the chemicals are sealed off and buried underneath the soil. Griffon Park lies directly west, and currently, little residential development lies on either side of the area. The area is monitored with air and ground monitoring devices to measure the toxicity of the site.

 

At an unknown date, chemicals began seeping into the Niagara River. A concrete bulkhead has been constructed on the shore to stop the seepage of chemicals into the river. The area is fenced off on all sides.

 

History

The landfill takes its name from 102nd Street, a street that ran through the area before residents were evacuated and homes demolished.

 

The larger portion owned by Hooker was operated from 1943 until 1971.[3] In that time period, 23,500 tons of mixed organic and/or inorganic compounds, solvents and phosphates, and related chemicals were dumped here including brine sludge, fly ash, electrochemical cell parts and related equipment plus 300 tons of hexachlorocyclohexane process cake, including lindane.

 

The smaller portion owned by Olin Corp. operated from 1948 to 1970. 66,000 tons of compounds and elements and an additional 20,000 tons of mercury brine and brine sludge, 1,000+ tons of hazardous chemicals, 16 tons of concrete boiler ash, fly ash and other residual materials were deposited.

 

Currently, the chemicals are sealed off, contaminated soil being removed, and chemicals being removed. The area as of 2008, has been deemed reusable, but no developmental measures have been taken.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/102nd_Street_chemical_landfill

104. Jones Sanitation, Dutchess, NY

 

The Jones Sanitation site is located in Dutchess County, New York. An industrial and septic waste disposal facility operated at the 57-acre area from 1956 to 1977. From the early 1960s through 1979, the landfill accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges generated by Alfa-Laval, formerly known as the DeLaval Separator Co. of Poughkeepsie. These materials were oils and greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, metals from plating operations, pigments, phenols and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including methylene chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene (TCE). EPA has completed cleanup work and took the site off the Superfund program’s National priorities List. Long-term operation and maintenance activities are ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202045

105. Katonah Municipal Well, Westchester, NY

 

The Katonah Municipal Well site is located in Katonah, New York. The City of New York (NYC) owns the site property. Well sampling identified several volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The contamination was traced to a local septic waste collection facility. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 2000. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202269

 

 

106. Marathon Battery Corp., Putnam, NY

 

The Marathon Battery Company site is located in Cold Spring, New York. The 70-acre area includes a now-demolished nickel-cadmium battery plant and 11 surrounding acres, the Hudson River in the vicinity of the Cold Spring pier and a series of river backwater areas known as Foundry Cove and Constitution Marsh. The battery facility operated from 1952 to 1979, producing military and commercial batteries. Facility operations contaminated soil on the plant grounds and adjacent properties and sediments in Foundry Cove, adjacent marshland and the Hudson River with heavy metals and groundwater with a volatile organic compound (VOC).

 

 

Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in October 1996. The site is now ready for reuse. East Foundry Marsh and East Foundry Cove have been acquired by Scenic Hudson, a conservation organization.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201491

 

107. Niagara County Refuse, Niagara, NY

 

he Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York.  The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill.  The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed.  Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site.  After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded.  The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976.  Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004.  Long-term monitoring is ongoing.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266

 

108. North Sea Municipal Landfill, Suffolk, NY

 

The North Sea Municipal Landfill is located in Southampton, New York. The 131-acre North Sea Landfill Superfund site is an inactive municipal landfill owned and operated by the Town of Southampton, New York. The landfill accepted trash, construction debris and septic system waste from 1963 to 1995. The site consists of four areas: Cell No. 1, Cell No. 2, Cell No. 3 and former septic sludge or scavenger lagoons. Site monitoring found that disposal activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and soil with heavy metals. Monitoring also found evidence of leachate from the landfill. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included closure of Cell No. 1 by constructing a landfill cap and perimeter gas venting system. EPA determined that groundwater required no action because contaminant levels were within EPA's acceptable risk range. All cells are now permanently closed and Cells No. 2 and No. 3 are no longer part of the site. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation regulates those cells under its municipal waste landfill closure program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202198

 

109. Radium Chemical Co., Inc., Queens, NY

 

The Radium Chemical Company (RCC) site is located in Queens, New York. The site consisted of an abandoned building on an approximately 1/3 of an acre of land.  From the mid-1950s through 1983, RCC operated at the site, leasing specially packaged radium to hospitals for use in the treatment of cancer. When it was abandoned, the facility contained a large quantity of radium-226 sealed in small metal tubes or rods referred to as "needles," totaling about 120 curies. These metal tubes were repackaged to prevent the release of radioactivity and were removed and shipped to a facility in Nevada dedicated to the disposal of radioactive wastes.  After these immediate actions were performed to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup took place focusing on the removal of residual radioactivity at the site.  EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 1995.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202850

 

110. Suffern Village Well Field, Rockland, NY (REMOVED)

 

The 30-acre Suffern Village Well Field site is located in Suffern, New York. The Village of Suffern operates four production wells that provide water to about 12,000 people at a rate of almost 2 million gallons per day. In 1978, the State detected trichloroethane, a volatile organic compound (VOC), in the public water distribution system. The Tempcon Corporation, a small oil burner reconditioning business, was identified as the source of the contamination. The company is located 2,500 feet uphill of the well field. Until 1979, the company used trichloroethane-based solvents in their process, and discharged waste fluids into a seepage disposal pit.. All residents in the area use municipally supplied water. Site cleanup has been completed. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1993.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202277

 

 

111. Syosset Landfill, Nassau, NY (REMOVED)

 

The 38-acre Syosset Landfill site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. The landfill operated from about 1933 to 1975. Between 1933 and 1967, no restrictions were imposed on the types of wastes accepted at the landfill. Waste types included commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, agricultural, sludge material and ash. In 1967, with the opening of another landfill east of Syosset in Old Bethpage, the town stopped using the landfill for disposal of domestically generated wastes. Some industrial wastes continued to be disposed of at the landfill until its closure in 1975. Following the site’s cleanup, EPA took it off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in April 2005.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201187

 

 

112. Tronic Plating Co., Inc., Suffolk, NY (REMOVED)

 

The Tronic Plating Co., Inc. site is located in Farmingdale, New York. Tronic Plating occupied the southeastern corner of a long building in an industrial park area from 1968 to 1984. It provided electroplating and metal protective coating services for the electronics industry. The half-acre site consists of the long building, two inside aboveground storage tanks, four underground leaching pools and a storm drain in the paved area northeast of the building. Following site investigations and removal of contaminated waste, EPA determined that the site did not pose a significant threat to human health and the environment. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 2001.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201346

113. Vestal Water Supply Well, Broome, NY (REMOVED)

 

The Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site is located in Vestal, New York. The site is a municipal well contaminated by a bulk chemical handling facility. After contamination was discovered in 1980, the well was taken out of service. The well was returned to service in 1988. The well had been contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Similar contaminants were detected in Well 1-1, which is located in Water District 1. The two were originally listed as one Superfund site and were later separated into two Superfund sites: Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 and Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Following the completed construction of the site’s remedy, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1999.

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202152

 

 

114. Warwick Landfill, Orange, NY (REMOVED)

 

The Warwick Landfill site is located in Warwick, New York. The site is a 19-acre unlined landfill. In the mid-1950s, the Town of Warwick leased the property from the Penaluna family and used the area as a refuse disposal area. Evidence indicates that there were some hazardous materials disposed of at the landfill during this period. The Town of Warwick operated the landfill until 1977, at which time the owner leased it to Grace Disposal and Leasing, Ltd. In 1979, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) sampled leachate seeping from the site and detected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals and phenols. New York State subsequently issued a restraining order and closed the landfill. Following investigations, the site’s remedy was put in place. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2001.

115. Wide Beach Development, Erie, NY

 

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201695

 

 

https://www.epa.gov/superfund/national-priorities-list-npl-sites-state#NY

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