49 results found

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Kingston, NY

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES MARCH 2020 INTERVIEW BY LINDA MARY MONTANO FEBRUARY 2020 VOICES & CHOICES - THE EAR - BROOKLYN, NY AUGUST 2019 REMARKABLE NEW LOCATIONS - CX SILVER GALLERY - BRATTLEBORO, VT JUNE 2019 ILLUMINATING INTANGIBLES - PARA\\EL PERFORMANCE SPACE - BROOKLYN MARCH 2019 SHAPE OF A FEELING 2018-PRESENT SEEMRIPPER - ELIZABETH FOUNDATION - NYC OCTOBER 2018 LANDLINES - CX SILVER GALLERY - BRATTLEBORO, VT AUGUST 2018 WE CAN'T TELL WHAT WE'RE DOING - HiLO GALLERY - CATSKILL, NY AUGUST 2018 NEW SITUATIONS - THREE PHASE CENTER - STONE RIDGE, NY JUNE 2018 WHISTLE PORTRAITS - HiLO GALLERY - CATSKILL, NY JUNE 2018 FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD - PANOPLY PERFORMANCE LAB - BROOKLYN, NY MAY 2018 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION WITH FEMINIST ART GROUP AT ABC NO RIO / BULLET SPACE IN NYC MAY 2018 HYMN WARP TRANSDUCER AT BEDSTOCK - NINE HERKIMER IN BROOKLYN APRIL 2018 MUSCULAR BONDING PHOTO DOCUMENTS - ST. LOUIS, MO FEBRUARY 2018 PIANO PORTRAITS - HiLO GALLERY - CATSKILL, NY FEBRUARY 2018 BEAST CONJURING - MOTHERSHIP - WOODSTOCK, NY JANUARY 2018 VIDEO MANIFESTATION SYSTEM - RELEASED BY HUMAN TRASH DUMP NOVEMBER 2017 VIDEO MANIFESTATION SYSTEM USER ARCHIVE NOVEMBER 2017 BLACK BEDROOM - HOLLAND TUNNEL GALLERY - BROOKLYN, NY OCTOBER 2017 FEMINIST ART GROUP AT OLD GLENFORD CHURCH STUDIO - GLENFORD, NY SEPTEMBER 2017 SHIRT FACTORY CENTENIAL - KINGSTON, NY SEPTEMBER 2017 CYBORGS & GENDER - RADICAL DOMESTICITY - KINGSTON, NY AUGUST 2017 CAVE GIRL - WOODWARD, PA JULY 2017 FAMILY SOUNDS - TEMPORARY UNGOVERNABLE ZONE BY ANARKO ART LAB - FT. TILDEN, NYC JULY 2017 JUST SITUATIONS - FEMINIST ART GROUP - GRACE EXHIBITION SPACE - BROOKLYN, NY JUNE 2017 EXPERIMENTAL ARCHERY - ROSEKILL PERFORMANCE ART FARM - ROSENDALE, NY JUNE 2017 MOTHERING - ROSEKILL PERFORMANCE ART FARM - ROSENDALE, NY JUNE 2017 YARD WORK - HURLEY, NY MAY 2017 GIANT DRESS - ROSEKILL BARN - ROSENDALE, NY MAY 2017 OUT IN THE ZONE - JUDSON MEMORIAL CHURCH - NYC MAY 2017 THE FABRIC OF WOMEN'S SPACETIME - LACEMILL GALLERY - KINGSTON, NY MAY 2017 ART WRESTLING TOURNAMENT - HiLO - CATSKILL, NY MAY 2017 UNITY - THE LACE MILL GALLERY - KINGSTON, NY MAY 2017 ACTIVATING PERCEPTION - MIDTOWN ARTS INTERVIEW - KINGSTON, NY MAY 2017 STAGES - GREENKILL GALLERY - KINGSTON, NY APRIL 2017 PROPERTY - ROMAN SUSAN & ROGERS PARK / WEST RIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY APRIL 2017 THE EUCHARIST MACHINE - BANGKOK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL MARCH 2017 M.K. ULTRA MINDCONTROL RABBIT - THE SHIRT FACTORY - KINGSTON, NY FEBRUARY 2017 SALIENT MEMORY MANIPULATING PENDANT LAMP - THE SHIRT FACTORY - KINGSTON, NY FEBRUARY 2017 ADDITION = SUBTRACTION FEBRUARY 2017 TIME MACHINE RESEARCH - PANOPLY LAB - BROOKLYN, NY FEBRUARY 2017 JSP PLUMBING COMMISSION - KINGSTON, NY NOVEMBER 2016 MOTHER VS. GOD - SAN DIEGO ART INSTITUTE - SAN DIEGO, CA SEPTEMBER 2016 LAUNDRY LOOPS - FEMINIST ART GROUP / JOB - PANOPLY LAB - BROOKLYN, NY NOVEMBER 2016 CERTAIN SOLUTIONS - ARTISTS & LOCATION - CZONG INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART OCTOBER 2016 MOCK THE CHASM / THE GOLDEN CALF - ARTLIFE INSTITUTE - KINGSTON, NY NOVEMBER 2016 UMEWE HAPPY SPOT - KINGSTON, NY 2016 JURNQUIST COLORINGBOOK SHOW - SALON FIDLÄR - BERLIN SEPTEMBER 2016 HYPERACTIVE INSTALATION - THE SHIRT FACTORY - KINGSTON, NY JUNE 2016

  • Multidisciplinary Artist | New York | Nina A. Isabelle

    Nina Isabelle HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Addition Equals Subtraction, 43.50 x 62.25, house paint and flashe on canvas, 2017 Nina A Isabelle performing in Temporary Ungovernable Zone for Anarko Art Lab at Ft. Tilden, NYC. Photo by Jaime Rosenfeld RECENT / CURRENT / UPCOMING - , , May 1, 2020 Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation Grace Exhibition Space, NYC -Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, . May 15, 2020 Grace Exhibition Space, NYC - , An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 EQUINOX - , Brooklyn, NY, August 23, 2019 The Ear - Remarkable New Locations - Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, May 18th - June 15th, 2019 - PARALLEL -104 Meserole Street, Brooklyn NY, Saturday, 7:PM March 23rd,2019- -documentation discussion panel with featuring at , 2:00-5:00 LiVEART.US Emergency INDEX Queens Museum February 17, 2019 - Emp by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, athy Blinders Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 - , As Far As The Hart Can See / In Honor of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts , NYC, October 20th, 2018 - , Linda Mary Montano, Nye Ffarrabas, Cai Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Lee Xi & Sharon Myers, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, August 24 actLife -Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity, Movement Metaphors Workshop, Kingston, NY, August 24, 2018 - , August 11 - September 22, 2018, , Catskill, NY NO NUDES NO SUNSETS Green County Council on the Arts -Whistle Portraits, Linda Montano & Nina Isabelle, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY, July 28 - with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows Griess, , Sept.1, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY DRAMATIC OBJECT MAKING / EMPATHY BLINDERS THREE PHASE - , July 20, 2018 - August 26, 2018, Catskill, NY WE CAN'T TELL WHAT WE'RE DOING, HiLo - , Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY June 10, 2018 Whistle Portraits - , Anarchist Art Festival, Judson Memorial Church, NYC, June 8 2018 ANIMALIA - w/ Lorene Bouboushian & Friends, , 1:PM-DARK, May 27, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY GUTTER HANGER THREE PHASE - EMBODYING THE OUTER BODIES: a demonstration of low-level energetic vacuum form technologies 7:PM, May 24, 2018, PPL , Brooklyn, NY - , Feminist Art Group, , May 6, 2018, NYC Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives www.bulletspace.org - at Bedstock Exhibit, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY, April 15, 2018 Hymn Warp Transducer s Paul McMahon' in , March 2-3, 2018 - New Genres at Living Arts Tulsa,OK - at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus)- Feb 15 - March 5, St. Louis, MO MUSCULAR BONDING released by - February 26, 2018 - The Video Manifestation System Human Trash Dump - By Linda Mary Montano with Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at , Catskill, NY, Feb. 11, 2018 PIANO PORTRAITS HiLo - , , Woodstock, NY, Jan16-21, 2018 by Nina Isabelle BEAST CONJURING The Mothership http://paulmcmahon.tv/mothership - , Human Trash Dump, November 27, 2017 MKUVM https://archive.org/details/htdc002 - by The Women Artist Team, , Brooklyn, NY , October 20- November 12 , The Bedroom 4th Iteration Holland Tunnel Gallery , Joe's Garage, October 6, 2017, Catskill, NY -Patricia Field's International Art / Fashion Show www.greenearts.org , Greene County Council on the Arts, October 7 - November 11, 2017 -CENTENNIAL:SHE - , Kingston, NY, September 16, 2017 The Shirt Factory Centennial Celebration- Performance / Open Studio - , Nina's House & Yard Studio, Hurley, NY September 4-6, 2017 F.A.G. Slumber Party - Kingston, NY September 26, 2017 We Are The Secret Garden: An Evening of Performance, - , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea, July 23- Aug. 7, 201 The Bedroom 7 - , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY, July 23, 2017 Just Situations https://justsituations.wordpress.com - , Anarcho Art Lab / ARTINYC, Ft. Tilden, NY July 8, 2017 Temporary Ungovernable Zone - , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 10, 2017 Experimental Archery Workshop http://www.rosekill.com - Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 3, 2017 , Mothering http://www.rosekill.com/ - N Y C , , NYC, May 12, 2017 Anarchist Performance Art Festival #11 The Judson Memorial Church - , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingsotn, NY, May 13, 2017 The Fabric Of Women's Space-Time - , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, N, May 6-13, 2017 UNITY - ,Catalunya, Spain, August 2017, The Unstitute's Projection Room http://www.theunstitute.org/Projection.Room.html - , Performance by Clara Diamond with Valerie Sharp & Nina Isabelle, , APRIL 15, 2017 STAGES GREENKILL - CHICACO, IL, APRIL 1-30, 2017, , R O M A N S U S A N / RPWRHS, P R O P E R T Y www.romansusan.org - Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand, March 4-12, 2017 Bangkok Underground Film Festival , - , January 22, 2017, Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY SHORTCUT TO HELL www.otionfront.com - , April 2017, Catskill, NY HiLo Art https://www.hilocatskill.com - February 4, 2017, Panoply Lab, Brooklyn, NY EotW (Embarrassed Of The Whole) http://www.panoplylab.org - November 12, 2016, Art/Life Institute Kingston, NY Mock The Chasm, http://www.artlifekingston.com/ - /// at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY JOB IV Soldier's Feminist Art Group , San Diego, CA October 1-31 -S an Diego Art Institute - The Dead Are Not Quiet - , Green Kill, Kingston, NY, October 1-15 Animal Maximalism www.greenkill.org - October 14, Ellipsis Art, Philadelphia, PA , POLITRICKS: Theories & Other Conspiracies , September 23-October 9, Czong Institute For Contemporary Art, Gimpo Korea, - Artist and Location www.cicamuseum.com , September 24, Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin - Jurnquist Coloring Book Show

  • LINDA MARY MONTANO INTERVIEW | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... N I N A A. I S A B E L L E NINA ISABELLE INTERVIEWED BY LINDA MARY MONTANO 2020 transcribed by Brian McCorkle L: We ask the angels to inspire us. So Nina, um, tell me the story of you and Sylvia and her illness. ​ N: Well she had never been sick, really. Never really been to the doctor or, I mean she'd had like a cold or a couple of fevers in her lifetime, she's 9 now. So I usually, when she would get a fever in the past, I would just, wait it out. We never really went to doctors - I would of course if it was an emergency but we never had to. In this case she had a fever on Monday morning so she stayed home from school and - I just kept taking her temperature that day and thinking that she would probably just have a regular fever and it would just be a couple of days and she would be back in school. By that night her fever was getting higher it was like 103 and 104, and the next day, at the end of the second day, her fever was 105. So I brought her to the emergency room in Kingston and they took her temperature in the waiting room and it was 105. And, they gave her some Tylenol and Motrin, which i'd been giving her at home also. When the doctor came to see her at the emergency room her fever had come down to about 102.7 - and they tested her for strep and the viruses by doing nose and throat swabs - and they sent those to the machine in the lab to determine if she had strep or any viruses - and those came back negative and they listened to her lungs and they couldn't hear anything. And they sent us home saying that she had another virus that their machine just couldn't detect and to just continue treating her with Tylenol and Motrin or Ibuprofen. I had the feeling that something was wrong and that they were missing something and I wasn't in the right mindframe to say so or speak up - it was like every time I went to form my thoughts and say something to the doctor it was like he was talking and I just couldn't figure out what I needed to say or wanted to say - it was like I had a feeling something was wrong but - I think I thought I said that having a 105 fever was pretty high for a virus. And he said "Oh, no it wasn't 105" And I was just thinking, well it just was in the waiting room with the nurses, but he was saying it wasn't. It was this weird feeling of believing him because he was a doctor but knowing that he was wrong when he said that she didn't have a fever of 105 with such authority. So, when we left I was really irritated by that whole experience. The next morning she was still not better, she was - I would look at her and she would kind of look like she was blue, and I would look again and she didn't look blue. So, there was again this feeling of, did I, am I correct in that? It was this continual process of checking in with my perceptions and not really knowing what was real, but also being a person that has experienced a lot of things that have caused me to learn to trust myself. So it was like a whole other level of that way of being. So I took her to the pediatrician that afternoon, and he, by that time she had a rash on her body and her mouth looked weird and she had been throwing up all day, not able to keep any fluid down. And he tested her again for strep and his machine said that she tested positive for strep and he said it looked like she had scarlet fever because she had a rash all over herself. And her tongue was white. So he gave her some Amoxycillin to take, and I thought "Oh, well, good, so it was something" - I knew it was something - I was feeling hopeful that this would - that she would take these antibiotics and he said they would work really quickly and that she would turn around really quickly and that scarlet fever isn't really as big of a scary deal as it sounds, and that it responds quickly to the antibiotics and she should feel better the next morning. So she still wasn't able to keep any fluid down, she was looking blue and green and really pale and really lethargic - her breathing was starting to be really rapid, and it seemed as if she in pain. She kept saying she had pain in her lung, I didn't know it was her lung then, I thought it was her stomach, where she was indicating. So, we got home and I tried to give her the antibiotic and she just threw it up, so I called the doctor and asked how long does it need to stay in her stomach until it had gotten into her system and they said "Oh it should be fine, just give her another one in the morning." So I was just sort of getting her ready to go to sleep and in the morning we would get up and she would be better, or at least starting to be better. But I had this feeling, like maybe I should take her into the hospital again because something just didn't seem right. So I kept going back and forth with that thought, "just wait until morning she'll be better" and "no you should take her in again." But then also we've already been to two doctors and they'd sent us home and it just seemed ridiculous to go to a third emergency room after hours. And I didn't want to go back to the Kingston Hospital because they already missed the fact that she had strep and sent us home and said she had nothing wrong with her. ​ I was really on the fence about going back to the hospital - I just felt like they were going to say "oh nothing's wrong - go home and wait it out" - but I think this is the scariest part of it is that I almost didn't go to the hospital. I decided to go to Poughkeepsie, which is a half an hour drive, but I knew it was a better hospital, and by the time we got there there was all kinds of Christmas traffic because it was night, it was December 16th or 17th. She wasn't able to walk or move, and she had turned blue, we pulled into the parking lot - I didn't know if I should call 911 but I was in the hospital parking lot so I just hoisted her onto my back and fireman carried her from the parking garage to the hospital. It was dark and windy and everything was vacant, it seemed like there were no street lamps. It just seemed really like, time slowed down, like I was carrying this near-lifeless child through this parking lot towards this light of the entrance of the hospital. And I went in the front entrance and they said "This isn't the Emergency Room it's around the other side of the building." So I just quickly turned around and started running as fast as I could with her on my back. And we had to traverse the side of this giant hospital in the dark, like we were going through alleyways with dumpsters, it seemed. And there was just no one around. It just seemed really unbelievable - one of those moments when time is just stretching out and you're aware of the urgency and ridiculousness of your situation. So I got into the Emergency Room door which was around the other side of the building it was a really small entrance. And they wheeled up a wheelchair behind me and I plunked her down into it and they saw that she was blue and not moving and didn't really look alive so they quickly hooked her up to a monitor and it said that her heart rate was 180 and her oxygen level was like 58 or something, really low. They kept hitting the machine saying "this can't be right - this can't be right" and a couple of them were just taking their time, trying to get the machine to be accurate. Then one nurse came rushing out and she said "The machine's fine! Get Doctor -" um, the pediatrician who was on call there, I forget his name. And they rushed her back there and they immediately gave her a shot of Venkomyacin, she'd gone septic and they didn't know, initially, what was wrong with her. They were asking all kinds of questions, had she been exposed to something. They just put her in an ambulance and I got in the front of the ambulance and we rode to Westchester Hospital, and they put her in the intensive care unit for children and we didn't know what was happening at that point. They gave her an ultrasound of her body and it showed that her left lung was full of pus. They couldn't hear that, neither the emergency room or the doctor's office could hear that for some reason when they listened to her chest, I guess because it was so full. So, they drained her lung the next morning by putting her unconscious and putting a tube in. Then she - they showed me a picture of the X-Ray and you could see her esophagus going off at a 45 degree angle from her throat, and her heart was shoved up into her left shoulder area because her lung was so full of pus that it was displacing her heart and her esophagus - it was the worst looking X-Ray I've ever seen. Like a person's body parts all in the wrong spot. It was just this feeling of time being altered and not having any control over the situation and knowing that I needed to be fine with that. L: Nina do you need to take a break right now and put your hands on your heart? And thank yourself for - just thank your heart, thank yourself, just be - gratitude. Thanking Nina. - pause - L: Can you imagine Sylvia in your arms, healed. N: Yeah, and I've recited the facts of this situation so many times and it's much different than the actual experience. L: And what's your feeling today, where are you vibrating with it today? N: I think this whole situation is sort of in another compartment, it's like frozen there for the sake of reflection or study. Because, I don't think I could go around each day actually with this memory in my - like the memory and awareness that I use in my every day life. So, it still feels kind of unreal, and as if it never happened, and also as if it was no big deal at all, and also as if it was a life-changing event. As if there was life before this and life after this. So it has - you know I don't know if it hasn't been enough time but it hasn't settled, it feels like the time that we spent in the hospital was, could have been like an entire year. It could have been 20 years ago, or 3 years ago, or yesterday. It feels like it could have been much longer or much shorter, it feels like it could have been 3 days or an entire year. The time around it and having to do with - everything having to do with this is just warped in this time and space way. L: So there's Nina the mother and there's Nina the artist-mother, and you were able to be in touch with so many people via your iPhone, the group chats. But you also, just from photos and with stories, Nina the artist really came to that situation, in terms of how you dealt with room, and the people and the doctors and the nurses and the visitors, so could you tell me about Nina the artist, in the room with your daughter? N: Yeah I thought about this a lot because I was talking with you Linda on the phone, most days we would check in and you would ask how we were doing and we kept in close touch and I - I remember, I don't know how many years ago it was, but I was talking to you about this time Sylvia and I were in the grocery store. And she was throwing a tantrum, and my cart was full of groceries, and I just had to abandon the cart and leave, these really difficult mothering moments. And you said something like "What would the mother that you would want to be - how would that mother be performing, and how could you perform as a mother in that situation?" And I remember having this huge realization when you said that, that I had a choice how I responded to Sylvia, that I could perform in that moment as a mother having a child who's having a tantrum in the grocery store. Just this realization that performance could be - that could be a coping mechanism - but it's not really a coping mechanism it's like a mechanism, so - ever since that point I've really used that performance mechanism in my mothering, because I've really had to because we wind up in so many difficult situations. And it's not performance in the way of being perfect, it's more like what is my role here and how can I embrace that role? That mechanism of awareness really creates that ability to view multiple possibilities and then choose one. And then even if that possibility that you chose isn't working out - you're still able to step out of that role, view a hundred more possibilities, and chose another one. So it gave me this really maneuverable framework for navigating mothering and life. So I already had been sort of practicing that, in a way that became very natural to my just daily way of going about, that I didn't realize until this latest hospital experience how much I rely on that mechanism as a mother and as an artist and all throughout my life, it's now something that informs my choices and my awareness about my artmaking projects, circumstances and situations I find myself in life, or if I'm envisioning and conceptualizing different possibilitie - that sort of performance mechanism that you introduced me to has really informed my approach to life, mothering, and art. So that was one of my big realizations, in this process, or in this experience. L: You're also a scientist, you know, you're a trained and practicing massage therapist - you're multi-multi leveled, multi-talented, so you have access to so many different personas, and quote characters and other voices that you can use and you really pulled out or pulled into all of them. Because I remember either reading or hearing from you that the scientist was wowing the doctors and nurses and the artist or the artist-mother was creating an installation in the room, the mother was in bed with the daughter - it was just an incredible, incredible experience for us, who knew about it online and knew about it being connected to your heart and to your heart, we all love you, and then Sylvia, and then Brian. So it was just - literally, I couldn't do anything while this was going on, I was just with you every second. I couldn't I couldn't function outside the persona of being Nina's love and Nina's friend. That was my, my practice. N: Yeah it was essential, and I can't even express the web that we all became, people coming and going, so many people were involved and connected and just wanting to help in so many ways - and helping in so many ways, that it was like - I'm not a person who's able to just sit around, and there wasn't a lot of sleeping over the 17 days but - it was Christmas and we had construction paper, we were making daisy chains and decorating the room, and the room became filled with hanging paper chains and cut-outs and it became a really exciting room that way. We were studying all the different antibiotics she was on and what their scope of treatments were - which things they would kill and which things they wouldn't. Making lists and crossing off things because the doctors couldn't really - they weren't really able to identify which bacteria had caused the lung to fill up - so we were - I was trying to figure that out by processes of elimination. And that became these long long lists and learning about how antibiotics can have antagonistic effects on each other and it seemed like the two that they were giving her were canceling each other out and they would add a third one and the fever still wouldn't come down and the white blood cells would still go higher - she was on three antibiotics and it was just getting worse. So it was definitely entering science mode, definitely entering busy mode of just manipulating material with my hands non-stop, talking to people, just really being outside of myself. And I was remembering, I'd worked many years ago in search and rescue in Yosemite Valley, and there was a similar thing that happens there when there's an emergency and you just get down to doing the work. And that I remember that time shifts, time stops, and you just have - it's like everything's in slow motion. So I guess as a scientist and artist who's thinking and working with perception - in this case I'm still stuck thinking about the role of perception, I'm thinking about why we percieve certain situations - why time is warped and bent, and for what purpose, what parts of us make that happen? And how can we control that or maximize it? L: Do you think your early training as a gymnast and as a high-flying, risk- taking performer, that that internal persona allows you to confront high-flying life-art issues, in this case? All of your past actions and trainings came together. N: Yeah, I think - my Dad was a gymnast and an acrobat and a trampolinist, and so from the time I was little he would be tossing me up in the air and having me balance on his hands - we would be doing hand balancing and acrobatic things - and training me on trampoline, I would be launching myself in the air. So I was really, had this, I think maybe in a way that puts a person outside of their body, so I had this really strong sense of my physical body, and an equally strong sense of the space outside of my physical body, so it's almost like I inhabited two spaces. So, I think it created the ability to see myself from outside, which is why, Linda, when you introduced the idea of choosing roles, that was really a surprisingly simple thing - as much as I'd been able to see myself from outside my body I had never imagined this possibility of seeing that self choose - make choices. So, as much as I have this experience of being outside my body sort of naturally, I'm missing a lot of experiences that seem very natural for other people that have to do with awareness of choice. So I think it has its pluses and minuses, being disconnected - not disconnected but having a sense of the outside-the- bodiness. L: Is that because there's a level of suspension that comes from having been suspended - it's almost like an angelic timelessness, an angelic suspension, and... N: Yeah I don't know I've thought about this in relationship to having been a trampolinist because, I remember, when I was maybe 15 or 16 I had quit gymnastics and I just wanted to focus on trampoline. So I was learning these really complicated skills on the trampoline, one of them was a double-twisting double- backflip, which you do in succession with a bunch of other tricks. So it requires jumping up in the air and flipping around two times while you spin around two times. So it takes these really tiny muscle movements and you're going really high in the air, and it's so many tiny movements that it feels like you have a year when you're up in the air doing that trick. I can still, even to this day, feel the microscopic movements inside of my body that you need to do in order to make that trick happen. Yet, in that split second, the amount of time it takes to perform that trick, it expands and it seems like you have, maybe an entire minute or five minutes or something. So, we used to use video cameras to record ourselves and you could see this, just this human going up in the air and spinning around really quickly and then landing. And when you slow motion the thing down you can see: "Oh, my elbow was sticking out, I need to pull my elbow in" - you just saw these really microscopic things that you needed to do with your body, like just tuck your chin in a quarter of an inch or something. So, I thought about this when I was studying body work, and I forget which practioner was talking about people who'd been in car accidents, where their body comes to a direct halt. They've been speeding, and then the physical body comes to a quick halt, that the etheric or energy body continues to move past the car, and outside of their body, and their energy body didn't come to a halt, it just kept kind of gliding into the space in front of them. So, I thought about my experience as a trampolinist and this high-impact kind of jumping, this being-in- the-air, maybe that was happening. We wouldn't call it "traumatic experience" because you were choosing to do it and you didn't usually get hurt but it caused this similar thing to the "outside body" that maybe happens when people are in car crashes or other high-impact injuries or something. It's just a perception of time being weird and altered. And the perception of the body, the physical body and the outer bodies. L: So, it's almost like three personas, I'm sure there are more, there's Nina the artist, with all kinds of things happening in that room: the stars and paper cut- outs, and iPad games, and there's Nina the scientist, which you are also, who's doing all of this medical research, there's Nina the partner with Brian as collaborator, and there's Nina the Mother. There's no which one is second, third fourth, and I'm sure there's more, there's Nina the spiritual seeker. So there's these five to seven, to twenty-faceted - there's Nina the daughter, who's relating to parents what's going on, Nina the communicator. It's this multi-faceted opera of care and love, that is unbelievably fertile, rich, and applaudable. What would be your advice to other mothers, to other fathers, to other others in this situation? What - it's a teaching, what you did, is a teaching, it's a course, you could study what you did for years! What all you went through. What do you think people studying what you did will come away with or learn, or need to learn? N: The first thing that I kept telling other mothers when I would see them is just, "Go to the doctor, don't try to ride it out, it doesn't matter." I have so many friends, myself included, we try to avoid going to the doctor, because maybe it's expensive, or we don't trust them, or something. The first lesson, practical and the lesson that can save the most lives potentially is just go to the Doctor. It doesn't matter if you're wrong, just keep going. If you know that something is wrong don't trust them, just keep going to the Emergency Room over and over and over if you have to. I think that's the most urgent, pressing message that I found myself wanting to tell my other Mom friends. I think I'll probably be more inclined to go to the doctor all the time now. Also, from being involved in athletics we were trained to never go to the doctor, you know. So it was sort of overriding this programming I'd had my entire life that the body is invincible and it can heal itself no matter what, you never need to go to the doctor - that's the most practical advice. And probably I think - I don't know, there were times when I was thinking "I don't know how I'm doing this, I don't know how I'm not falling over or screaming or having an anxiety attack or being really scared or crying." I don't know how all of those things didn't happen, other than to say it was thanks to this performative mechanism that allowed me to really be present with what was happening and to realize I was in control of my anxiety and my fear, and that those sorts of responses wouldn't have any impact on the outcome. So, that sort of awareness and logical thinking kind of let me off the hook. "Oh, I don't need to have anxiety, I can see how that's not useful." L: As a practicing artist, you mention four or five things: screaming, anxiety, et cetera. Do you feel that the coming-down-from-the-suspension, or from twirling or twisting, from being put into the air of this situation; do you feel that those are things you'll be dealing with in your work, or in therapy, or that you will scream in your house when you're alone in your house, or do you feel that these kind of detrituses and these left overs, this material, do you have any idea how you'll be using the material? N: Yeah, I feel like it's probably not ready to come out, like it's sitting, solidifying a little more, I think when it comes out, then, it's going to be really directed, and that might show up in having - I mean I know this from going through things like this in the past that it gives me this ability to be really clear in my impulses and my choices and my instincts. To recognize when an institnctive notion is occurring and to direct it really quickly and not question myself. So, I think maybe all of these sort of difficult experiences in my life are continually fortifying that mechanism of choice-making and embracing and owning decisions and actions. Where there's not really a lot of - it's been training me to function in this way that's just sort of following impulse, but also the impulses have been correct in a lot of ways. Or it's like they're getting to be better, they're not always the most useful or beneficial thing, but it's like honing that mechanism, to where I feel like, eventually, a person, if they keep going through stuff like this for their whole life, might be able to direct that process really effectively. L: And you said persons going through this, I'm kind of thinking, like my brother's a surgeon, and my niece is a pediatrician and an internist: I'm thinking medically right now, and, you had 17 days of really being in close proximity with the medical, more than that, close proximity with people in the medical world. What did you learn from them? N: They have these slogans, like "We operate on Occam's Razor!" L: What was that? N: "Our protocol is developed based on Occam's Razor!" The most likely scenario is the most probable, is probably it, or something. "All of our decisions are informed by protocol, we don't-" they don't use, if they have a hunch or a notion, they have to bend their protocol to sort of force a way for their instinct, whereas operating as an artist I might have an instinct or a notion and I might have to force some sort of rules or material, physical material, to suit my notion. So I could see - just, that they have this kind of comfort with fencing themselves in with this, because it's like life or death, when you're on the fence and making a decision like this about whether a child lives or dies, you can't, as a human, be like, making a quick instinctive decision. Because you're not going to be 100% correct. So they have to put these parameters in place so that they're not accidentally killing children. L: What does that look like? N: They're working with something that's more important I guess, it's not more important, but it's much different than "Oh I'm going to make a sculpture and the welds didn't hold" or "I had the welder set on 4" or something, it's like "Oh I made a mistake" but it's not like somebody's going to live or die because I chose the wrong color or, you know, my seams didn't hold, or someone disagreed with what I was doing, or one of those things like, as an artist, being misunderstood, like worst case scenario you do a project, no one understands it, everyone misunderstands it, it fails, or something, it's like "So fucking what" there's no children who just died so it doesn't really matter, so that's sort of liberating. L: It makes us glad to be artists? N: I guess so, not to say that it's just frivolous, I think we're all searching for real useful ways of going about that translate to how to live life effectively, and that can save lives. L: I always felt that I wanted the same level of integrity as my brother had when he was doing surgery on a child. I wanted that same brilliance, that same, integrity again, that same attention, that same, care, that same, knowledge. Because that's a level to aim for, and that's a level that I could feel in a family member and want to emulate. N: Yeah it's probably great if we have that level of care and awareness in everything we do in our lives, and I agree. Because even, I guess on the surface it doesn't seem like anybody lives or dies based on any of my successes or failures with all of my art projects, but they're, they're little spirit ideas, little spirit babies or something. So it's, I mean, I guess it would just be, if we were to decide that human spirit, human beings were different or more important than idea-babies or spirit- babies. It's probably not true that there's a hierarchy and one is more important than the other. L: But the endurance that you participated in with your daughter and with your partner, Brian, and your ex-husband being there also in the picture, has, was an invitation to the next level of excellence. Because there's a graduation from the heart, our hearts, our hearts expand from these life endurances. And then it's like the art, the art will, the art will benefit. Or the life will benefit. N: Yeah, and that's really sticking with me, more and more, as I know you, and am influenced by you. There really is no difference between my life projects and my art projects, and that they both deserve equal levels of integrity. L: How is your relationship with Sylvia altered, changed, moved into or out of, or... what's new, what's old, what's? N: Well, I've made a point of, I have my observations of she and I's relationship, and I've tried to be really clear in not articulating her experience as my experience, or my observation of her experience may not be correct. So I, kind of refrain from imposing my observation of her experience, and what it might be. I witnessed her working with certain things in this circumstance, being confronted with things she had no choice over. Kids are given a lot of encouragement in this era, lately, that they have choice, and that they have choices about their bodies and what things they say are okay and what things are not okay. That they need to make good choices and use their voice, and make these choices. So she's been raised that way, except in this case, she was put in a position where she didn't have any choice, they had to take blood when they had to, and they had to do stuff to her, she didn't choose, and she didn't want to. And so it was difficult for me to watch that sort of reckoning and realize, we've been wanting to give our kids this, idealized notion that they have choice and autonomy and their body is theirs, and it's all great and well-meaning things, except in a case like this, you also have to be able to give over, to give over control of the things that you can control, and to know the difference - the ability to know, when you don't have a choice, and the ability to be okay. So she's 9, and she hasn't had many experiences like that, so watching her, have a crash course in that, is one things that I noticed, as far as she and I's relationship, that's a tough one to speak about. We're still so connected, that we sort of have an understanding of each other and our relationship to each other that's unlanguageable. Just, feeling and knowing each other in a way that is still really instinctive and connected in some, sphere that doesn't have language. And then also experiencing the stuff that does have language, just being really tired of whining, and all of the regular mother things, like really needing her to do what you're asking her to do, and being really tired, with those regular sorts of parenting things. L: The ability - what would you say to mothers about honesty? What I've observed in your relationship with Sylvia, in general, you have a rule that being honest and forthright and saying the truth, no matter how truthful or puzzling or upsetting or shocking it might be, never stops you, and so in a way that really helped, because I could see that some people might not have been as able to be truthful in the circumstance you were in - to talk about blood and guts, and sickness and life, in front of your daughter and also - anyway, I think you're very brave. And would you recommend - how would you get other people to be as brave as you? And is that from being suspended in the air? N: I don't know. L: Why are you so brave and how can you teach that bravery? N: I don't know because, brave, I might have just learned it, you know, parenting, you learn a little bit of it from the way your parents raised you, and some of that is good and bad. I mean, my Dad was kind of a fearless person and he talked a lot about violence and fighting and blood, so a lot of his speaking was really straight forward and graphic and, he had been in a lot of fist fights and he was kind of a rough and tumble person, and his father was - he had a lot of experiences growing up in a tough area where he, found a finger, this guy jumped him and he punched him and just kept punching him, and so, I just grew up with these - I kind of question it now. That is a defense mechanism, I think, to speak about bloody and graphic things with such ease, it's partly conditioned, I don't think it's great, because as I've gotten older and I've gotten more respect for the body, I think that's, not such a healthy response, to be so vocally graphic about things that are so important. But that's how he was, and my family is still kind of like that, so I don't know, I guess the other thing is being disinhibited, which could be from head injuries, or it might just be a way or being that I am, I can't really not say what I'm thinking, and I never think it - I think it benefits everybody involved to know the most information, and if everyone said what they were thinking, I think everyone would appreciate that. L: Ra, ra! Applause for all that, fabulous, thank you for mentoring that. And I'm sure those nurses were applauding you, and doctors. N: Yeah, maybe doctors and nurses are used to that, sort of, speaking. L: How did the animus of Brian's presence, who actually has a lot of anima in him, how did you feel, he supported you, and how would you recommend, future people who would be in a similar situation to ask for the kind of support you got from him? N: I mean, he was just continually there, there wasn't a question of whether he would be there for us, he just was, and that was really comforting. The feeling of, I didn't even have to ask, there was no resentment, it was just, straight up, unconditional help and support. Neither of us, I mean we were tired, but that wasn't even an issue. So I think, just having another person there was really great, and really gave me a lot of stability and comfort. And Sylvia too, he was able to, a lot of times, defuse things that were happening, then he would pick up, and start reading books to her and stuff. I guess, just having the ability to collapse a little bit and know that somebody else was going to be there. L: If you were to interview Nina right now, what would you ask her, about this experience? N: I would ask her, how is she going to be, how is she going to be better the next time this happens? What is the thing to carry and learn, the next thing? I don't even know if there's a way to answer that because it will just evolve over time. Or, how will she, I wonder if these spheres of reality will, over time, converge? And how would she know if that has happened and what would it matter? L: What does converge mean, to you? N: I guess the experience is kind of fragmented from my awareness, I notice when I start to retell the facts of this experience, that they're kept in another compartment of my awareness that's really far from the awareness I use to go around in my daily life. I wonder if there will come a point when the distance between those two modes of functioning becomes closer. L: What does she say to Nina? N: She would say, "Why does that matter? Between those things. Why are you fascinated with where things are, the location of perceptions? Why do you care so much about wanting to know where things are and how they get from one place to another?" L: I could answer that. N: You could? L: I am Nina, and I am up in the air! My dance threw me up in the air, and I don't know where in the name of God I am! I'm twisting, I'm turning, I'm trampolining and I'm jumping, and I'm up and I'm turning around and I'm falling down - I don't know where I am, and the distance, relations, so that's - N: Right, that makes sense, thanks Linda. ​ L: My God! My God! Oh my God, where am I? What's the relation to the next - I'm an angel, flying. ​ N: Hm, good point. ​ L: So, Nina says to all parents [long pause] You talked about money today, before we began, it was so beautiful, and you talked about bills coming to you, through her birth father, that she had insurance, it was so touching, you talked about money, because most people are just like cray-cray about, totally cray-cray. And you said, with all beauty, yeah there was one bill, about $15,000 or eighteen and then you said, I want you to close your eyes, and feel this, you said "I don't care if it was a million dollars, I don't care if I had to pay for the rest of my life, if it was a million dollars, I would pay and pay, because it was my daughter's life that was saved." And that's, that's the other Nina. That's the new Nina. ​ N: Yeah, it was a perspective shift, at the same time we were in the hospital my septic system was blowing up in my house, and, you know, before we went to the hospital that was a terrible ordeal, and, you know, I hired this plumber, it was $300, not fixed, hired another guy, $900, kind of fixed, you need another thing, it's going to be $8000. And then, that very day, "your septic needs to be rebuilt, it's $8000" - we go to the hospital. I was on the verge of caring about that, you know, and in relationship to something like this, those other things that would really just be a really big deal in a person's life, just doesn't matter. I don't know how that will happen, it just will, I don't even care, right now. We're just not using much water for now, it's fine. So then all these other things, oh we hit a deer! I had to have my car repaired, just all these other things that at other points in my life would be like "Oh this is terrible, why is all this terrible stuff happening?" And now, it's like, it's like nothing, it doesn't even matter, all this stuff that used to matter, it just doesn't. ​ L: You know I'm thinking like Castaneda's, commandment, that we keep death on our left shoulder, is so lovely, because, if, and sometimes the translation is "Oh my God! Fill-in-the-blank is going to die! And I'm so, cray-cray, about what I'm thinking about Fill-in-the-blank right now!" But, if I was looking through the lens of, they're going to die some day, how would that change my direction, my position, my being-in-the-air, my endurance ​ N: That's another one of those magical Linda-perspective-shifting mechanisms ​ L: And you did it, you did it, you had a perspective shift, you had a large shift, and a very very powerful life-death journey, endurance. ​ N: Maybe the distance between those spheres of perception I was trying to measure and locate will become evident when I go back to being comfortable and I get to this point where I start to get mad about some stupid thing like, I'm thinking of my neighbor lady was mad because we drove on her yard and it made a dent on her lawn and she was so mad. And I could just sit there while she was yelling at me thinking "wow, she cares about different things than I do." So maybe when the experience, the near-death experiences and the mundane idiocy of daily life problems like holes in your yard, when those things start to become so far apart that you can't see the near-death experience any more and you start to care about a hole in your yard or something, maybe those things could indicate distance. I don't know if that would mean, like, getting closer together or farther. I don't know. ​ L: Somehow, it all boils down to love, and the vibrational frequency of love. And, and then translating that love and death and love and fear and how to come out, how to come out of these wonderful teachings with the banner, the banner for, the flag of love. I mean I'm thinking of, in the exact same scenario, you know, [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] - this is, off record maybe. N: We'll stop here [shuts recorder off]

  • FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY May 24, 2018 ​ Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL IMG_9611 Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle / /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself to be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Show More

  • MUSCULAR BONDING DOCUMENTS | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MUSCULAR BONDING-PHOTO DOCUMENTS Adriana Disman, Nina Isabelle, Kaia Gilje, Beth Neff, Esther Neff, Edward Sharp M.A.R.S.H, St. Louis / Living Arts, Tulsa, OK ​ February 15 - March 5, 2018 ​ Six people traveled, lived, worked, and performed together for three weeks as a durational collaborative performance experiment conceived and initiated by Esther Neff. On February 15, 2018 the muscular bonding began with a road trip from Panoply Performance Lab in Brooklyn, NY to St. Louis, MO. For two weeks the muscular bonding was fortified through focused materialization and activation of space and collaborative construction of material and living practices. From March 3-5 the muscularly bonded performed collectively to materialize participant's structural realities through devised scores as part of The New Genre Art Festival at Living Arts Tulsa. M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in ​ ​ ​ Kaia Gilje & Adriana Disman carry a sheet of dry wall up a staircase at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in St. Louis, MO. Photo: Nina Isabelle

  • ILLUMINATING INTANGIBLES | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ILLUMINATING INTANGIBLES Performance by Nina Isabelle & Amelia Iaia Para\\el Performance Space Brooklyn, NY March 23, 2019 English fails at describing the location of abstractions in relationship to the human body. Identifying such things is challenging and understanding our proximities to both physical and abstract structures or concepts is often merely a murky smudge within our perceptive fields and abilities. Recognizing how perceptions transition from one "place" to another requires deep inquiry into the question of how we arrive at sensing or knowing anything. Prepositions are words that describe the location of things in relationship to other things. While the English language has more than a million words to describe both subjects and objects, there are only150 prepositions, most of which fail when put up against or in combination with abstract nouns and concepts. To illustrate this problem, and simultaneously search for possible solutions, we generated a random list of prepositions paired with abstract nouns and verbs to determine 150 phrases that were used to produce an audio arrangement, interactive objects, a set of gestures, and finally a public performance as a way to illuminate the intangibleness of our language and perception situation.

  • SEEMRIPPER | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SEEMRIPPER A conceptual video-performance demonstrating artist as self replicating organism Seemripper was produced using The Self-Limiting Conceptual Video Production Process; a system that interlaces action, duration, direction, speed, sound, color, sequence, subject and object to form a linear audio and visual arrangement. The Self-Limiting Conceptual Video Production Process was designed as a system to sidestep consciousness in order to access lateral dimensions of awareness and is a continuation of The Video Manifestation System released by Human Trash Dump in January 2018. The video-performance frames the artist as a self replicating organism caught in a recursive loop of infinite destruction and renewal generated by the physical and quantum relationships between fire, water, air, metal and earth. This project was initiated by Linda Mary Montano as part of 'In Honor Of,' a performance series Curated by Nicolás Dumit Estévez Raful with curatorial fellow JP - Anne Giera at The Elizabeth Foundation in New York City on October 20, 2018. Performers were nominated by artists featured in 'As Far As The Heart Can See' (Nao Bustamante, Billy X. Curmano, Irina Danilova & Project 59, Beatrice Glow, Ivan Monforte, Linda Mary Montano, Praxis (Delia & Brainard Carey), Beth Stephens & Annie Sprinkle, and Martha Wilson & Franklin Furnace Archive) and include former mentees, current students, assistants and younger artists whose work they admire: Elena Bajo Bajo, Sindy Butz, Larissa Gilbert, Nina Isabelle and Xinan (Helen) Ran. Special thanks to Linda Mary Montano for the nomination, Jennifer Zackin for use of chop saw and welder, Ever Peacock for flight scene camera operation, and B.G. Isabelle for playing her flute.

  • VOICES & CHOICES | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ​ Performed at The Ear, August 23rd 2019 VOICES & CHOICES Referencing the ways misperceptions of fear, safety, danger, pain and the body create difficulty when voicing choices, this performance was an exercise in decision making, speaking up, and the difficulty that surrounds these things. I welded a steel cage for my body that was also a percussion instrument to be played on and off the body. I constructed and wore a garment of half visually reflexive material and half acoustically absorbent foam. The performance audio included partially told stories, inaudible language, and uncomfortable loud sounds. The performance was curated by Polina Riabova and organized by Oya Damla at The Ear in Brooklyn, NY. Photos by Kira DeCoudres

  • REMARKABLE NEW LOCATIONS | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... REMARKABLE NEW LOCATIONS Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle CX Silver Gallery, May- June 2019 Remarkable New Locations is a series of interactive art objects inspired by Nye Ffarrabas's poetry and produced by Nina Isabelle using a car as a printing press. The objects are interactive as they invite the viewer to engage in marking and remaking the dry erase surface as a way to facilitate perceptions of process, language, and action. The printing process involved inking each plate individually and pressing it into each sheet by driving a car over it to emboss the plate image into the saturated paper. Each piece was rolled over ten times with a car revealing various degrees of chance in the imagery. The original monoprint plate was produced using hand-etched plexiglass. Using black printmaking ink on 100% cotton 22x30 Arches 88 printmaking paper, the prints were individually processed, then hand painted using ink, gouache, and acrylic paint to highlight and color code the vowels using purple As, yellow Es, orange Is, blue Os, and green Us. The final layer is a hand cut transparent material affixed to the image surface machine stitched with orange thread. Nye Ffarrabas (formerly Bici Forbes and Bici Hendricks) has been an artist for 60 years and a poet for 80. She participated in Happenings beginning in 1961, as part of the Fluxus scene. In 1962 she interviewed several artists including Roy Lichtenstein, Bob Watts and Ivan Karp. In 1965, she established her own publishing company, the Black Thumb Press. Nye/Bici had her first solo show at Judson Gallery in 1966 and the next year performed Ordeals with Carolee Schneemann. In the 60s and 70s, Nye/Bici participated in many of the Annual Avant Garde Festival of New York events coordinated by Charlotte Moorman. Starting in 1964, Nye/Bici compiled journals as conceptual art with Geoff Hendricks, a series known as The Friday Book of White Noise which contains many seeds for her event scores. In 2019 Nye completed a mobius-strip-shaped infinite event score as a performance, installation and wall-piece.

  • SHAPE OF A FEELING

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SHAPE OF A FEELING Photographs of Piles by Nina Isabelle COLLECTION STARTED NOVEMBER 12, 2018

  • LANDLINES AT CX SILVER GALLERY | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LANDLINES Performance by Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin at CX Silver Gallery in Brattleboro, VT. August 26, 2018 An interactive type of immersion-therapy, Landlines invites viewers & participants to make their own meaning out of actions and gestures happening within a sea of dissonance. How do we cultivate the cultural phenomena of communication while agendas of power and dominance try to hijack our semiotic proclivity with fake news and ad campaigns designed to entrench us in divisive notions of entitlement and correctness? When lines of communication become connected to fear, anger, and resentment, how do we clear and reground them to empathy and grace? ​

  • TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES Equinox: EMERGENCY OF JOY - 10,000 THINGS SET FREE ​ Seventy one artists from around the planet work together remotely and simultaneously over the spring Equinox. Organized by Chelsea Burton, Rae Diamond, Erik Ehn, Brenda Hutchinson, Suki O’Kane, “Ten thousand is rooted in the Buddhist concept of the ten thousand dharmas – an image for all observable reality." ​ MARCH 19, 2020 11:49 PM EST - MARCH 20, 2020 1:49 AM EST (Equinox at 11:49 PM EST) ​ Things can be objects or subjects. While objects are tangible things abstracted from the particularness of subjects, subjects are the intangible concepts or notions we extract from objects. How do we process the intangible sense data we extract from encountering objects made of particles in the physical dimension and what do we call this process? What are the internal mechanisms we use to govern how we locate and position our physical selves in relation to objects in space? ​ For this project, I constructed and deconstructed a batch of 10,000 intangible and tangible subjects and objects as a way to set both their physical and nonmaterial aspects free. Through forming a set of 1,000 physical objects made of clay with my hands, the conceptual intangibleness of their essence was simultaneously set free and bound as it transformed into material form. Conversely, intangible concepts were released from physicality through the gestural motions accompanied by the transmutation of 9,000 subjects into nonmaterial objects.

  • 650 ml. OF LUNG PUSS | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... 650 ML. OF LUNG PUSS A seventeen-day artlife performance at Westchester Medical Center's Maria Fareri Children's Hospital in Valhalla, NY December 18, 2019 - January 3, 2020 was a seventeen-day performance initiated by a dire circumstance that ultimately demonstrated a quantum aspect of artlife processes. Influenced by my friend and artlife colleague Linda Mary Montano, the performance inspired a deeper understanding of a performance process that summons elemental energies from a nonlocational power source. These energies exist in a state of quantum superposition and can be programmed using intention, determination, focus, and sacrifice, to transmute pain, suffering, and trauma into tolerance, endurance, resilience, self awareness, control, forgiveness, grace, and gratitude. 650 ml. of Lung Puss The performance began on December 18th when I carried my near lifeless and blue 94lb. daughter across a large, dark, silent, windy, and cold parking lot into the hospital's emergency room. The energies that fueled this difficult task were conjured from a deeply derived performative physical power cultivated by all mothers collectively throughout eternal time combined with the tension building from a deadlocked schism between my intuition and the medical authorities. In the past two days, we had been sent home from the emergency room and a pediatrician's office. Meanwhile, my daughter had developed sepsis from Scarlett Fever, Pneumonia, and a pleural effusion in her left lung. Our hospital performance engaged members of our close community, artlife collaborators and colleagues, friends and family, and the larger medical community of ambulance drivers, EMTs, emergency room attendants, nurses,doctors, phlebotomists, surgeons, lab and x-ray technicians, infectious disease specialists, sanitation specialists, medical administrators, and so on. Together, we collectively transformed into an unintentional ensemble performing actions together as our best selves in order to save a child's life. We embodied multiple and often simultaneous roles and embraced the fluctuating spaces between these modes. We performed as mothers, organizers, brothers, partners, distractors, whisperers of encouragement, visitors, tear swallowers, fear fighters, candle lighters, gift givers, keepers of tempers, story book readers, temperature takers, practitioners of patience, hand holders, phone callers, researchers, organizers, group texters, medicine givers, vomit bucket holders, comforters, food providers, errand runners, and healers. On the final day of our hospital performance, Linda texted "rest art!!!" to our group. We were finally able to go home, perform rest, and RESTART. This performance demonstrated that art and life function as entangled dimensions through subtle quantum artlife processes. We learned that approaches effective in art and performance dimensions are also effective in dimensions of life and other realities, and that intentions and actions occurring within one dimension simultaneously reflect, impact, and are made evident in multiple ways throughout multiple dimensions. Engaging with life circumstances through performative art mechanisms allows us to translate the diverse array of creative skills derived from our disciplined artlife practices, (our responsive, intuitive, reflexive, mindful, and conceptual abilities,) into cognitive modes of awareness that inform the new life patterns necessary to thrive as artists in life. Through this post-conceptualizing processes, we gain the ability to sidestep linear chronologies and reframe the concepts of our engagements post-performatively as a way to articulate with the personal mechanisms of awareness and control necessary to make meanings and choices that fortify our collective artlives in new and beneficial ways. Paul DeVincent, Ernest Goodmaw, Sylvia Hallibelle, Chris Hallman, Erik Hokanson, Eric Hurliman, Ulysses Hurliman, Bg Isabelle, Ed Isabelle, Kate Isabelle, Lou Isabelle, Louie Isabelle-DeVincent, Margie Isabelle, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Jill McDermid, Paul McMahon, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Mor Pipman, Valerie Sharp, Maureen Sharp, Luke Stence, Jennifer Zackin, and Havarah Zawaluk, many anonymous medical professionals, hospital workers, elementary school teachers, school nurses, community mothers and children. List of Performers:

  • CONTACT | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE TO NINA A. ISABELLE'S QUARTERLY EMAIL HERE TO CONTACT NINA A. ISABELLE USE THE MESSAGE FORM BELOW: Send Email sent to Nina A. Isabelle

  • EXPERIMENTAL ARCHERY | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... EXPERIMENTAL ARCHERY & MARKMAKING WORKSHOP ​ @ ​ R O S E K I L L June 10, 2017

  • SILVER GELATIN PRINTS (1989-1999) | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SILVER GELATIN PRINTS 1989-1999 A Collection of gelatin silver prints made from photograms, handmade negatives, and experimental darkroom photographic processes. 1/1

  • AARON PIERCE | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Aaron Pierce February 2017 ​ A: I am a graduate from Utah Valley University and I am writing a dissertation for the university's biannual Art History Symposium. The topic of discussion this year is Maximalism. I am particularly focusing on performance art as the contemporary medium that is reinventing museum spaces and engaging audiences by stimulating the senses more through music, dance, film, and painting combined. That is where your exhibit Animal Maximalism came to my attention. I am completely intrigued and enthralled by your performance art pieces and projects you have created. For this paper, I would love to have your view on performance art and Maximalism. I am interested in hearing some of your methods about performance art and Maximalism. It is rare in art history to be able to have contact with the artist, hence my excitement. If you do not mind sharing your opinion, I would like to know how you feel performance art engages audiences and pushes them to connect on a higher level to art? Also, why are we seeing a shift towards more performance art pieces in museums and galleries? I feel that audiences want to have a full sensory experience. How does Maximalist performance art achieve this better than other medium of art? ​ N: I practice a process of allowance where I let myself do what I want. This approach results in maximum data and action. By letting myself engage with an array of modalities I can generate multiple outcomes and possibilities. Because I'm not limited to any single mode of involvement, I'm free to use painting, performance, photography, or video or a mixture of modalities as I find necessary depending on my agenda and instinct. This suits my athletic, resourceful, and determined nature. ​ I approach performance art in the same way I would approach any other art modality- by paying close attention to gut instincts and psychic impressions in a process designed to override cerebral programming. The aim is always to align action with intention, and make note of the findings and outcome along the way. Performance art is a good choice when the concept I'm grappling with calls for a human body, action, or a narrative to actuate the outcome, especially literal concepts like worshiping the golden calf or using blood to cleanse things. My body can become a tool, a stand-in, or effigy of or for the viewer, creating a point of commonality to facilitate access. Aligning action with intention is also a way to re-frame ritual and an attempt to validate the effectiveness of approaches historically relegated to realms of religious structures and beliefs. I was recently invited to teach an art theory class for kids at The Hudson Valley Sudbury School. Through our discussions it emerged that the students felt most drawn to art practices and outcomes that suited the nature, mentality, and necessity of the individual artist. For instance they could relate to how Chuck Close became successful at painting faces as a result of his lifelong struggle with a facial recognition disorder. In reflecting on my personal method it occurs to me that my mode of operation is dictated by my nature, I didn't choose to function within the Maximalism approach and philosophy, it's just that the philosophy happens to align with my nature. I'm a serial over-doer of all things who relishes the opportunity to push things too far. My work is reactionary because I'm a reactionary person. For instance the first time I encountered minimalism I was ready to explode in a thousand directions. And, as an art student I couldn't help but challenge typical art professor's slogans such as "You have to know when to stop." Of course I could recognized the academically dictated stopping point but I would never in a million years stop there. I've always felt that learning how to challenge, push, or destroy something is a valid study when handled respectfully and with intention. ​ Performance art is an another mode of operating for artists to use in order to find or generate new information, to experiment with creating new experiences, or to try to express something they otherwise couldn't. It can engage the viewer in an intimate way offering the potential to build powerful experiences as it facilitates a space that can involve and include the viewer in a novel physical or psychic way. It's possible that since performance art inhabits walking space where gallery-goers would otherwise be moving about, a psychic connection is created by sharing the same space. As viewers, we know less about what it would be like to hang motionless on a wall. Performance art offers a platform for artists to practice aligning action with intention, a way to possibly re-frame ritual and to build experimental new models for of control or power to replace outmoded religious structures and beliefs. But also, It's possible the performance art trend might be a way for artists to backhandedly confront consumerism and elitism simultaneously, or at least to create the illusion of doing so. Commercial galleries and academic environments can be market driven or exclusive, but performance art has the ability to dissolve those traditional notions and to expand viewership by engaging broader mentalities in a way that would be difficult for strictly visual work focused on heady concepts or dollar amounts. And since we live in a culture of visual bombardment, where viewer's digitally conditioned eyes and minds are increasingly savvy, and in conjunction with consumer programming, we need something that can function both inside of and outside of commercial gallery and academic paradigms. There is a literal dissolution of boundaries. Since performance art is impervious to ownership and commodification, it pushes against market-driven capitalist structures and challenges a system where finances determine success. Issues of marketability, ownership, or commodity all come into play because its difficult to financially capitalize off of performance art. So, maybe it's like most trends- timely and culturally necessity. ​ I developed the Animal Maximalism exhibition concept as a way to bombard the human sensory input manifold with the intention of revealing cloaked information. I use the word "Animal" as an homage to instinct. For me academia operated through reversal, fueling my defiance more than refining me the way school is supposed to, so part of my mission has always been to build legitimate framework for us animals, one that is less cage-like, and Maximalism is a good framework for that agenda. I try to work within and build upon systems that already exist that might reflect and support my authentic nature, and to allow my work to reflect and be a response to the full spectrum of my body's biologic manifestation of its own history within its cultural environment. Maximalism feels like science-fiction, in that it offers the potential for system building where the inward personal landscape can travel all the way outward through the giant jumbled experience of collective household, community, country, and planetary psychic connections. Maybe performance offers an easier access point to the viewer in that we can all relate to each other as humans who are human shaped and have human form. We all share common ways of moving our human forms through space. It's possible that performance could function to create a portal, like a way out or a way in.

  • SILENT MASS GENERATOR | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE SILENT MASS GENERATOR WORKSHOP GES #411 ARCHIVE SPACE ​ NOVEMBER 6, 2015 incorporated the public to assemble, build and incorporate physical mass within an experimental simulated mindfulness environment. The duration of the workshop spanned 5 hours and 44 minutes inside of The Grace Exhibition Space Shirt Factory Studio #411. There was no speaking, eating, or drinking. Participation was not required, participants were free to come and go, or stay for a portion of the workshop. The workshop was designed to distract the subconscious mind by the tedium of cutting, ripping, and tying material to form long strands in order to facilitate the entry into a mindful, meditative, psychic space. The project explored the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint. An experimental soundscape designed with Christina Amelia Diamond acted as an electronic gong wash intended to initiate 23 cycles of ordered energetic body activation using specific Hz. Other auditory Information within the noise composition was generated by The Entity. Speaking was disallowed at The Silent Mass Generator Workshop. The Entity thanks Jeanie Antonelle, Undine Brod, Leonard Fujiyama, Hillary Harvey, Mor Pipman, and Christina Varga for their contribution of materials. The Silent Mass Generator Workshop CALL FOR MATERIAL DONATIONS ​ SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 The Entity seeks donations of scrap, waste, or unsellable materials such as fabric cut-offs, twine, rolled or spooled material, rope, ribbon, thread, or anything that is in long strands or could be cut and tied to form long strands. The nature of the project has lead to the present development of an official CALL FOR DONATED MATERIALS. The Entity also seeks donations of traditional artist’s materials as well as non-toxic industrial materials which might be repurposed. The upcoming phase of the project includes an opportunity for community participation with an interactive component in the form of a silent workshop intended to build physical mass through the hands-on manipulation of donated material. The workshop will be free and open to the public. FEEDING THE ENTITY ​ MARCH 2015 explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint. Feeding The Entity

  • Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ​ NINA A. ISABELLE 3607 Atwood Rd. Stone Ridge, NY nina@ninaisabelle.com (814) 777- 6990 Nina Isabelle is a process based multidisciplinary artist working with perception, action, language, and phenomena. She builds performative frameworks as staged inquiries into how sensory perception functions as the impetus for action, reaction, response, and choice making in art and life practices. These situational inquiry vignettes combine sculptural objects, soundscapes, formed or draped body coverings, and intention within a performance structure to explore the ways sensory experiences form concepts, inform thought progressions, compel action, and the unconscious and conscious impact these variables have on decision making processes used to construct meaning and worlds. Motivated by the failure of dialogue, the dissonance between form and content, the imposition of objects in space, as well as the deficiencies of literal language, her projects highlight how modes of psychic imprinting and cerebral interpretations come together to organize perception in ways that can inform and solidify new possibilities. By arranging task based actions, repetitive gestures, categorical movements inspired by number sequences, patterns, location, and direction into open time segments that facilitate improvised movements and reactions, she builds a performance structure where surprises and new information can occur. Through balancing choreographed and improvised movements, the structure gently nudges observers toward a process of psychological transference that might lead to introspection. Isabelle's performance model often includes constructed objects such as welded steel wearable structures that double as percussion instruments, life size human forms, sewn garments and other wearable objects, wrapped wooden structures, or suspended electronic arrangements. Each object is project-specific - designed and built to function as tools that can demonstrate how physical ways of going about creating, destroying, interacting with, or transforming physical material might reveal information about ways of navigating nonphysical, psychic, mental, intellectual, and emotional landscapes. Her projects regularly include soundscapes made of inaudible language or partially told stories, text-to-speech robots, discordant and degraded audio bombardments, multilayered cacophonic barrages of audio samples taken from her life including gun shots, clicking bicycle sprockets, wind hitting a microphone, her children, and her own improvised interactions with musical instruments. She uses these soundscapes as a way to either engage and scramble or distract and divert a portion of the listener's perception and awareness. She uses photographic and video documentation as an instrument to highlight and inspect sensory inconsistencies and memory schisms by simultaneously displacing perception into three different vantages - the observer, the observed, and the observer of the observed. In this way, documentation becomes a tool to sort and solve sensory perception problems related to sequence and simultaneity, physical location and material, the affability of memory, the complexities of self and other, and the inconsistencies experienced by the observer and experiencer over time. Isabelle has presented work at The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York City, The Queens Museum as part of Emergency Index Documentation Discussion, ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space in NYC with Feminist Art Group, Para//el Performance Space and The Ear in Brooklyn, NY, Paul McMahon's Mothership social sculpture in Woodstock, NY, as well as at The Judson Memorial Church in NYC as part of The Anarchist Art Festival, and with Anarko Art Lab's Ungovernable Zone at Ft. Tilden, NY. Her work has been presented at Roman Susan in Chicago, IL, The San Diego Art Institute, The New School's exhibition at The Bushwick Collective, CX Silver Gallery in Brattleboro VT, and HiLo in Catskill, NY as well as internationally at The Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Gimpo, South Korea, The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain, Studio Fidlär in Berlin, The Bangkok Underground Film Festival in Thailand, NA Gallery in South Korea. Isabelle is the founder and organizer of Three Phase Center for Collaborative Art Research & Building in Stone Ridge, NY where she facilitates, collaborates with, and documents the work of process based conceptual and performance artists. Her ongoing documentary series, Documenting Process, aims to substantiate the utility of art processes that might successfully circumvent hierarchal value structures by highlighting the essential value of process as a way to address complex social problems and to discover new ways of going about. The series builds data that will be used to identify subtle structures of process and approach, authenticate the essential value of these ways of working, and to discover and differentiate language around process as a way to sidestep the institutional methodologies that seem to restrict and exploit these beneficial approaches to art making and problem solving. ​ Exhibitions, Collaborations, Participations & Projects 2020 Spheres of Performance, Perception, and Value, virtual presentation for The Hynes Institute of Entrepreneurship & Innovation, September 2020 2020 Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation, , May 1, 2020 Grace Exhibition Space, NYC 2020 Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, . May 15, 2020 Grace Exhibition Space, NYC 2020 EQUINOX, An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 2019 The Shape of a Feeling & the Languages of Organizational Structures, The Esthetic Apostle, October 2019. Web. 2019 Choices & Voices, The Ear, Brooklyn, NY 2019 Remarkable New Locations, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2019 April 5th Video for Daily Trumpet by Jonathan Horowitz. Web. 2019 Illuminating Intangibles with Amelia Iaia at Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY 2019 Documentation Discussion with LiVEART.US & at Emergency INDEX Queens Museum 2018 Empathy Blinders by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 2018 LaTable Ronde / Critical Practices Round Table #7.1 on NYC Careerism, 2018 In Honor Of, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, NYC 2018 , Linda Montano, Nye Ffarrabas (Bici Forbes,) Cai Xi, Lee Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Sharon Myers, C.X. Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT actLife 2018 , Movement Metaphors Time Travel Workshop, Kingston, NY Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity 2018 , Greene County Council on the Arts, Catskill, NY No Nudes / No Sunsets 2018 with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY Whistle Portraits 2018 with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY Whistle Portraits 2018 , 2018 Anarchist Art Fair at Judson Memorial Church, NYC Animalia 2018 Performancy Forum, , Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY ForceYourself to be Good 2018 , Feminist Art Group, ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space, NYC Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives 2018 Paul McMahon's Bedstock, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY The Hymn Warp Transducer, 2018 New Genres Arts Festival, Living Arts, with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, Tulsa, OK Muscular Bonding, 2018 M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus,) with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, in St. Louis, MO 2018 by Nina A. Isabelle, Human Trash Dump, www.archive.org, Video Manifestation System 2018 with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo in Catskill, NY Piano Portraits 2018 , The Mothership, Woodstock, NY Beast Conjuring 2017 , Human Trash Dump, Nov. 27, 2017, MKUVM www.archive.org 2017 , The Unstitute, Catalonia, Spain & Virtual Vidiot 2017 4th Iteration of by T.W.A.T. (The Women Art Team), Holland Tunnel Gallery, Brooklyn, NY The Bedroom 2017 , Greene County Council on the Arts, Catskill, NY CENTENNIAL:SHE 2017 Patricia Field's Art/Fashion Show, Joe's Garage, Catskill, NY 2017 Feminist Art Group Performance, Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY 2017 Midtown Arts District Art Walk, Kingston, NY 2017 The Shirt Factory Centennial, Kingston, NY 2017 The Unstitute's Projection Room, by Selden Paterson & by Nina Isabelle, Catalonia, Spain & Virtual Integrative Ontological Practices The Eucharist Machine 2017 , The Stable Yard at Ernest, Anna, & Ming's in Kingston, NY We Are The Secret Garden 2017 , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea The Bedroom 2017 Just Situations with FAG, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2017 by Anarko Art Lab at at Ft. Tilden, NYC Ungovernable Zone Secret Garden Art Festival 2017 with F.A.G at Rosekill, Rosendale, NY Beautiful Symphony: Women Creating Chaos 2017 Experimental Archery & Mark Making, Rosekill, Rosendale, NY 2017 , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY MOTHERING 2017 , Legacy Fatale, Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY If You Don't Go Out In The Woods 2017 oUT iN tHE zONE, Anarchist Art Festival #11, Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 UNITY, The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 Wish You Were Here II, The Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY 2017 Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.) , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY Knights of The Round Table 2017 Green Kill Gallery, Kingston, NY Stages, 2017 Property, Roman Susan & Rogers Park / West Ridge Historical, Chicago, IL 2017 Bangkok Underground Film Festival, Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand 2017 Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY Embarrassed of the Whole, Time Travel Research, 2017 Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY SHORTCUT TO HELL, 2016 with JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. (Feminist Art Group ) Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY Laundry Loops , 2016 San Diego Art Institute, San Diego, CA The Dead Are Not Quiet, 2016 , Czong Institute For Contemporary Art (CICA) Museum, Gimpo, Korea Artist and Location 2016 Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin The Jernquist Coloring Book Show, 2016 , Art Ellipsis, Philladephia, PA PoliTRICKS 2016 Feminist Art Group in IV Soldiers Gallery at Rosekill Performance Farm, Rosendale, NY 2016 85th Annual Woodstock Library Fair, Woodstock, NY 2016 The Shirt Factory Open Studios, Kingston, NY 2016 The New School / Bushwick Collective, Brooklyn, NY 2016 , Wired Gallery, High Falls, NY The Shirt Factory Artists 2016 , The Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY Wish You Were Here 2016 Installation and Performance at The Art Life Institute with Clara Diamond, Kingston, NY 2016 / Alice Teeple- , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY The Pain Project Now Is Real 2015 , Grace Exhibition Space Archive, Kingston, NY Silent Mass Generator Workshop 2015 , The Parliament, York, PA Instinct 2015 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Posthumous Collaborations 2015 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Abstract Mediums 2014 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Witness: The Cedar Tavern Phone Booth Show 2014 , Punk Rock Fish Studio, Berlin, MD Old Pro 2014 Art Along The Hudson at S.P.A.F, Saugerties, NY 2014 Star House Gallery, Studio Sale, Kingston, NY 2014 Varga Gallery Memorial Day Group Show, Woodstock, NY 2014 curated by David Barr, Artspace,Falls Church, VA Bold And Bright 2013 -Nina Isabelle/Lucienne Weinberger, Stray Cat Gallery, Bethel, NY Ethos of Abstraction 2013 The Garden Cafe, Woodstock, NY 2013 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Diagnosis Artist 2013 , Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY Half Your Age 2013 Barrett Art Center, , Poughkeepsie, NY Kinetic 2013 Art Foray, Wired Gallery, High Falls, NY 2013 , Hole In The Wall Gallery, Mechanicsburg, PA Home Grown 2013 , solo show, Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA Outer Expressions of Inner Mayhem 2012 , The Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA Bits & Pieces 2012 , Hole in The Wall Gallery, Mechanicsburg, PA Cool Cats 2012 Fall Season Show, Greenpoint Gallery,Brooklyn, NY ​2012 , Unison at Water Street Market Gallery, New Paltz, NY IDIOM 2012 Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY The Maltese Falcon, 2012 Trash Art Gallery at The Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA 2012 , Mills Pond House Gallery, Smithtown, Long Island, NY 2012 , Projekt 30, NYC 2012 Cornell St. Studio, Kingston, NY 2012 Varga Gallery, Goddess Show, Woodstock, NY 2012 , Tivoli Artists co-op, Tivoli, NY 2012 , Varga Gallery. Woodstock, NY 2011 Paintings / Drawings, Lovebird Studios, Rosendale, NY 2011 Season Show, Art @ Home, Kingston, NY The Handmade Photograph Sex 7 Erotica Birds of a Feather 2010 Wings Gallery, Rosendale, NY 2007 South Main Studios, Gunnison, CO 2007 Paragon Gallery, Crested Butte, CO 2005 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2004 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2003 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2002 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 1999 Jewett Center, Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT 1998 Sundance Gallery, Sundance, UT 1998 Weber State College, Weber, UT 1992 P.S.A.D Student Gallery, Lancaster, PA 1991 P.S.A.D. Student Gallery, Lancaster, PA 1990 Centre Film Lab, State College, PA 1989 Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania, State College, PA 1988 Pennsylvania State Capital Building, Harrisburg, PA ​ Solo Exhibitions 2019 Remarkable New Locations, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2018 We Can't Tell What We're Doing, HiLo, Catskill, NY 2018 The Beast, The Mothership, Woodstock, NY 2017 Nina A. Isabelle at HiLo Art, Catskill, NY 2016 , Green Kill, Kingston, NY Animal Maximalism 2016 at The Shirt Factory Open Studio, Kingston, NY Hyperactive Installation 2016 , Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY The Pain Project 2014 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY The Random Community Generator 2013 , Metropolis Collective, Harrisburg, PA Inner Mayhem 2002 Nina Isabelle, Gunnison Art Center, Gunnison, CO 1999 , Bibliotheque, Salt Lake City, UT Handmade Photographs Performance 2019 Illuminating Intangibles, Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Land Lines with Jennifer Zackin, C.X. Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, Secret City, Woodstock, NY 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY 2018 Embodying The Outer Bodies / Force Yourself To Be Good , Brooklyn, NY Panoply Performance Laboratory 2018 Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives, Feminist Art Group, , NYC www.bulletspace.org 2018 The Hymn Warp Transducer, Paul McMahon's Bedstock, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Muscular Bonding, New Genres Arts Festival, Living Arts, with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, Tulsa, OK 2018 M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus,) with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, in St. Louis, MO 2018 Piano Portraits with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo in Catskill, NY 2018 Beast Conjuring, The Mothership, Woodstock, NY 2017 , The Stable Yard at Ernest, Anna, & Ming's in Kingston, NY We Are The Secret Garden 2017 Just Situations with FAG, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2017 by Anarko Art Lab at at Ft. Tilden, NYC Ungovernable Zone Secret Garden Art Festival , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY 2017 MOTHERING 2017 , Legacy Fatale, Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY If You Don't Go Out In The Woods 2017 oUT iN tHE zONE, Anarchist Art Festival #11, Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 The Fabric of Women's Space-Time, The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 , Green Kill Gallery, Kingston, NY Stages 2017 Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY Embarrassed of the Whole, Time Travel Research, 2016 , Art / Life Institute, Kingston, NY Mock The Chasm 2016 at IV Soldier's F.A.G. Feminist Art Group at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY Laundry Loops JOB /// 2016 , The Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY Q: INFORMATICUS, P)REPARING THE REAL 2016 Performances Sketches / Clara Diamond's Residency at Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY 2015 , The Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY The Q: Entity 2015 , Grace Exhibition Space Archive, Kingston, NY The Silent Mass Generator Workshop 2005 , Taylor Hall at Western State College University, Gunnison, CO Mirror 2002 Jaquelynne Brodeur & Nina Isabelle, The Gunnison Art Center, Gunnison, CO What Do We Have? / Vanity / Death, 1999 , Jewett Center, Salt Lake City, UT The Dischordant Student ​ Video 2019 Documenting Process: Linda Mary Montano 2019 Documenting Process: The Architecture of a Stream by Valerie Sharp 2018 Documenting Process: Decompositions by Brian McCorkle 2018 Seemripper https://vimeo.com/296678389 2018 Video Manifestation System, Human Trash Dump, https://archive.org/details/htdc005 2017 Scuba Trip, Elizabeth Lamb & Nina Isabelle 2016 The Eucharist Machine, 4:48, https://vimeo.com/189071199 2016 8:40, Certain Solutions For Solving Problems, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltIadB4FuFI 2016 6:20, Domestic Loops, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeEYUtCZbKY 2016 0:47, Mother Vs. God, https://vimeo.com/176222556 2016 , 0:55 IBM- Tech City Re-Vision https://vimeo.com/182476408 2016 , 2:43, The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy https://vimeo.com/182594886 2016 Locational Trauma Transform, 2:54 https:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crlDcMZfy1M 2016 Performance Sketch at Art/Life Institute https://youtu.be/XzNUWDwvOTk 2016 The Story Of Terror / Ax In The Stump https://vimeo.com/176227354 2016 Building Connections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YdGO-7zrSY 2016 C O D E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcxJ4pHX8WE 2015 Feeding The Entity https://vimeo.com/140719399 2015 Siblings h ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LR4ErG0Khvc 2015 Q:Entity at Art/Life Institute https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5joer_gcyKQ ​ Curating / Hosting / Facilitating 2020 Social Dissonance, Paul McMahon, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 FUTURE: Shola Cole AKA Pirate Jenny, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Speed, Light, Motion & Gesture: Video Installation by Josh Babu, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Infinity Within & Without, Cai Xi and Le Xi, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Hurray! The Gland Doctors Graduate. Linda Mary Montano, Amanda Heidel, Arielle Ponder, Megumi Naganoma, and Lynn Herring 2019 Lorene Bouboushian & The Undoing And Doing Collective, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 The Architecture of A Stream by Valerie Sharp, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Public Vortex Weaving by Jennifer Zackin, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 The Malleability of Memory by Ernest Goodmaw, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 Eleven Modes of Decomposition by Brian McCorkle, Three Phase Center, Stone Rodge, NY 2018 The Obstructionist: Empathy Blinders & Dramatic Object Making with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows / Griess, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 Thinkers & Doers Feminist Workgroup with Ernest Goodmaw, Havarah Zawoluk and Anna Hafner, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2017 The Shirt Factory Centennial Performance & 3rd Floor Pop Up, The Shirt Factory, Kingston, NY 2016 at Green Kill, Green Kill, NY Animal Maximalism Performances 2016 Alice Teeple, , Star House Gallery, NY Now Is Real 2015 Owen Harvey, The Local Gallery, Kingston, NY 2015 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Recent Paintings by Chad Gallion 2015 : The Sudbury Photo Show, Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Through The Lens 2014 , Star House Gallery, KIngston, NY Adam & Jeff: An Abstract Painter and His Mentor 2014 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Parallel Places: Owen Harvey / Michael Hunt 2014 Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY The Cedar Tavern Phone Booth Show, 2013 I , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY saac Abrams / Kelly Bickman 2013 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Narrative 2013 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Artist Talk: Kerry Mueller 2013 , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Diagnosis: Artist Bibliography -"The Shape of a Feeling & the Language of Organizational Structures." The Esthetic Apostle. October 2019. Web https://www.estheticapostle.com/the-shape-of-a-feeling -https://www.greenearts.org/no-nudes-no-sunsets-a-photography-exhibition-opens-august-11/ - Varalla, Adriana. "12th Annual NYC Anarchist Art Festival." /anarchistbookfair.net/sites/default/files/Anarko%20Lab%202018%20PRESS%20RELEASE.pdf - Neff, Esther Marveta. "New Genres at Living Arts Tulsa." Blog Post. 7 March. 2018. Web. -Neff, Esther Marveta. "Muscular Bonding." Blog Post. 25 Jan. 2018. Web -Bresnan, Debra, "Activating Perception - Nina A. Isabelle." MAD Kingston. May 2017. Web -"GALERII Eesti Performance'i Grupp Non Grata Esines New Yorgi Anarhismi Festivalil."Õhtuleht. N.p., 24 May 2017. Web. 26 May 2017. - Elissa Garay, "Kingston: Capital of Culture." Chronogram. March 2017: p. Print. - Mills Messner, Heather. "Featured Artist Nina Isabelle." Aife Media Fall/Winter 2016: p.22-23. Print - Josh, Ryder, and Rutigliano Dario. "ARTiculAction Art Review // Special Issue." Issuu. Articulaction Art Review, Jan. 2016. Web. - Rutigliano, Dario, and Josh Ryder. "Nina Isabelle." ARTiculAction Art Review Jan. 2016: 124-49. Print. - Isabelle, Nina A. "Fashion Trends." Goodlife Youth Journal 5.1 (2016): p.20. Print. - George, James. "Nina Isabelle at Falls Church Arts, Bold & Bright." Arlington Art Examiner. 2014. Web. - Malcolm, Timothy. "Stumps For The Outsider." Record Online. Times Herald-Record, 13 Sept. 2013. Web. - Gussin, Bruce. "If It Isn't Not Broken Don't Unfix It." Blog post. Life and How to Live It. 5 Dec. 2010. Web. ​ ​ Residency 2006 Artist in Residence, Gunnison Art Center Summer Residancy Program, Gunnison, CO ​ Workshops 2018 Movement Metaphors Time Traveling Workshop, Healing + Art / Radical Domesticity, Kingston, NY 2017 Experimental Archery & Mark Making, Rosekill, Rosendale, NY 2017 Metaphors of Movement, Body Systems, Disease, and Society, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2015 The Silent Mass Generator Workshop with Clara Diamond, GES Archive 411 Studio, Kingston, NY Teaching 2014-2016 Photography, Hudson Valley Sudbury School Photography CO-OP, Kingston, NY 2016 Art History & Ideas, HVSS Art History CO-OP, Kingston, NY 2016 Introduction to Digital Photography, The Shirt Factory, Kingston, NY 2003-2006 Modern Dance, Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2006 Oil Painting Workshop, Crested Butte Center of the Arts, Crested Butte, CO 2006 Oil Painting Workshop, Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 1988-1990 Kids Photography and Dark Room, Woodward Camp, Woodward, PA ​ ​ References - anarchistbookfair.net -https://www.greenearts.org/no-nudes-no-sunsets-a-photography-exhibition http://www.greenearts.org/patricia-fields-artfashion-show-comes-to-catskill/ https://madkingston.org/2017/05/09/nina-a-isabelle/ http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9bbde55ac06fd4ebf2c0424ae&id=ef278b43c7 http://bangkokundergroundcinema.com/day-3-bridge/ https://justsituations.wordpress.com/ http://www.ivcastellanos.com/feminist-art-group/ http://romansusan.org/following/all/romansusan.org/Property https://madkingston.org/reframed-ritual-nina-isabelle-3715/ https://www.timeout.com/san-diego/things-to-do/the-dead-are-not-quiet-and-the-haunted-art-of-t-jefferson-carey http://artisbeing.com/blog/2016/9/28/san-diego-art-institute-the-dead-are-not-quiet-gallery-exhibiton https://greenkill.org/2016/10/12/nina-isabelle/ http://www.artlifekingston.com/blank-e19y5 http://cicamuseum.com/artist-and-location/ http://www.jennidachase.com/2016/09/21/sn-participates-in-the-cica-artist-location-exhibition-in-gyeonggi-do-korea/ ​

  • Nina A. Isabelle - Interviews & Reviews

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... INTERVIEWS LINDA MARY MONTANO INTERVIEW 2020 ACTIVATING PERCEPTION Midtown Arts District 2017 ARTiculACTion 2016 Aaron Pierce February 2017 ​ A: I am a graduate from Utah Valley University and I am writing a dissertation for the university's biannual Art History Symposium. The topic of discussion this year is Maximalism. I am particularly focusing on performance art as the contemporary medium that is reinventing museum spaces and engaging audiences by stimulating the senses more through music, dance, film, and painting combined. That is where your exhibit Animal Maximalism came to my attention. I am completely intrigued and enthralled by your performance art pieces and projects you have created. For this paper, I would love to have your view on performance art and Maximalism. I am interested in hearing some of your methods about performance art and Maximalism. It is rare in art history to be able to have contact with the artist, hence my excitement. If you do not mind sharing your opinion, I would like to know how you feel performance art engages audiences and pushes them to connect on a higher level to art? Also, why are we seeing a shift towards more performance art pieces in museums and galleries? I feel that audiences want to have a full sensory experience. How does Maximalist performance art achieve this better than other medium of art? ​ N: I practice a process of allowance where I let myself do what I want. This approach results in maximum data and action. By letting myself engage with an array of modalities I can generate multiple outcomes and possibilities. Because I'm not limited to any single mode of involvement, I'm free to use painting, performance, photography, or video or a mixture of modalities as I find necessary depending on my agenda and instinct. This suits my athletic, resourceful, and determined nature. ​ I approach performance art in the same way I would approach any other art modality- by paying close attention to gut instincts and psychic impressions in a process designed to override cerebral programming. The aim is always to align action with intention, and make note of the findings and outcome along the way. Performance art is a good choice when the concept I'm grappling with calls for a human body, action, or a narrative to actuate the outcome, especially literal concepts like worshiping the golden calf or using blood to cleanse things. My body can become a tool, a stand-in, or effigy of or for the viewer, creating a point of commonality to facilitate access. Aligning action with intention is also a way to re-frame ritual and an attempt to validate the effectiveness of approaches historically relegated to realms of religious structures and beliefs. I was recently invited to teach an art theory class for kids at The Hudson Valley Sudbury School. Through our discussions it emerged that the students felt most drawn to art practices and outcomes that suited the nature, mentality, and necessity of the individual artist. For instance they could relate to how Chuck Close became successful at painting faces as a result of his lifelong struggle with a facial recognition disorder. In reflecting on my personal method it occurs to me that my mode of operation is dictated by my nature, I didn't choose to function within the Maximalism approach and philosophy, it's just that the philosophy happens to align with my nature. I'm a serial over-doer of all things who relishes the opportunity to push things too far. My work is reactionary because I'm a reactionary person. For instance the first time I encountered minimalism I was ready to explode in a thousand directions. And, as an art student I couldn't help but challenge typical art professor's slogans such as "You have to know when to stop." Of course I could recognized the academically dictated stopping point but I would never in a million years stop there. I've always felt that learning how to challenge, push, or destroy something is a valid study when handled respectfully and with intention. ​ Performance art is an another mode of operating for artists to use in order to find or generate new information, to experiment with creating new experiences, or to try to express something they otherwise couldn't. It can engage the viewer in an intimate way offering the potential to build powerful experiences as it facilitates a space that can involve and include the viewer in a novel physical or psychic way. It's possible that since performance art inhabits walking space where gallery-goers would otherwise be moving about, a psychic connection is created by sharing the same space. As viewers, we know less about what it would be like to hang motionless on a wall. Performance art offers a platform for artists to practice aligning action with intention, a way to possibly re-frame ritual and to build experimental new models for of control or power to replace outmoded religious structures and beliefs. But also, It's possible the performance art trend might be a way for artists to backhandedly confront consumerism and elitism simultaneously, or at least to create the illusion of doing so. Commercial galleries and academic environments can be market driven or exclusive, but performance art has the ability to dissolve those traditional notions and to expand viewership by engaging broader mentalities in a way that would be difficult for strictly visual work focused on heady concepts or dollar amounts. And since we live in a culture of visual bombardment, where viewer's digitally conditioned eyes and minds are increasingly savvy, and in conjunction with consumer programming, we need something that can function both inside of and outside of commercial gallery and academic paradigms. There is a literal dissolution of boundaries. Since performance art is impervious to ownership and commodification, it pushes against market-driven capitalist structures and challenges a system where finances determine success. Issues of marketability, ownership, or commodity all come into play because its difficult to financially capitalize off of performance art. So, maybe it's like most trends- timely and culturally necessity. ​ I developed the Animal Maximalism exhibition concept as a way to bombard the human sensory input manifold with the intention of revealing cloaked information. I use the word "Animal" as an homage to instinct. For me academia operated through reversal, fueling my defiance more than refining me the way school is supposed to, so part of my mission has always been to build legitimate framework for us animals, one that is less cage-like, and Maximalism is a good framework for that agenda. I try to work within and build upon systems that already exist that might reflect and support my authentic nature, and to allow my work to reflect and be a response to the full spectrum of my body's biologic manifestation of its own history within its cultural environment. Maximalism feels like science-fiction, in that it offers the potential for system building where the inward personal landscape can travel all the way outward through the giant jumbled experience of collective household, community, country, and planetary psychic connections. Maybe performance offers an easier access point to the viewer in that we can all relate to each other as humans who are human shaped and have human form. We all share common ways of moving our human forms through space. It's possible that performance could function to create a portal, like a way out or a way in. The Cult of Painting by Nina Isabelle 2014 ​ Painting is a visual, psychological, or metaphysical study or exploration of an object or non-object, a place or non-place, an inner, outer, or simultaneous multiple psychic dimensions, something other, all, or none of the above. Various viscosities of liquid or paste suspending colored pigments in oil, wax, synthetic polymer, or other, are sometimes but not always laid down, poured, sprayed, or applied by the hand as an extension or non-extension of the wrist, elbow, arm, shoulder, hip, body, outer-body, aura, transcended-self, future-self, or by proxy with either a brush, tool, or other, onto a solid or canvas surface in either multiple or single opaque or transparent layers or strokes resulting in a tangible visual object manifest in the physical dimension as having weight, height, depth, mass, and occupying an amount or volume of time and likewise resulting in an equal to, greater than, or less than physical, psychological, or spiritual impact of understood or non-understood ethereal consequences within an inverse unquantifiable psychic dimension. The conception, execution, and result will or won't be quantifiable by subsets of verbal language, written or spoken, which may or may not contain specialized terminology.

  • ACTIVATING PERCEPTION | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ACTIVATING PERCEPTION - NINA A. ISABELLE MIDTOWN ARTS DISTRICT by Debra Bresnan May 10, 2017 ​ https://madkingston.org/2017/05/09/nina-a-isabelle/ ​ When did you first know you were an artist? Growing up people referred to me as an artist and so I became one – an experience that made me aware of the power of language, perception, belief, and social programming, all themes in my current work. It’s possible that if I had grown up in a different environment I might have been an engineer because as an artist I’m always working with how things like concepts of memory and phenomena articulate with visual and spatial perception, language, materials, and meaning and how to build generative dialogue between these factors. Where an engineer might work with materials, data, or electricity, as an artist I use a similar approach but with different variables. ​ Favorite medium(s) you use to make art? My favorite art medium is probably the phenomena of perception and how language builds reality. Right now my focus is on working to manipulate and bend notions surrounding the value and usefulness of art away from commodity and towards structures that represent essential and social value. Inside of this, working with painting I can still have an intention to study gesture, motion, and look for new languages that might emerge from this action and mark making or find new information in whatever emerges. I like to get my hands on chunks of materials like vats of clay, lumber, bolts of fabric, or discarded machine parts and sort of grapple with the stuff until it gives in to another form. Sometimes I might start out with an intention or give myself an assignment, but other times I let myself generate information by engaging with materials and paying close attention as I go. ​ Since I work pretty equally with photography, video, design, performance, installation, and painting, nothing is really off limits to me. I grew up at a summer camp for kids where we had an arts and crafts department with a ceramics studio, photo lab, leather tools, batik, enamels, silk screens, and fabric dye, among others. Nine months out of the year these departments were vacant and I really made the best of it – I learned to use the kiln and glazes by haphazardly blowing up and melting a lot of stuff, mixing chemistry by taste, a lot of other experimental and dangerous learning-by-doing that has carried over to my current approach. I never read instructions as a younger person because I couldn’t really read until I went to college. I’m rarely intimidated by new things, and I think that’s one of my favorite things about my development and approach. What are the most interesting new trends in your field? Is your work changing as a result? One of the most exciting things I notice right now is a shift toward recognizing the social value of art as a tool to reframe reality through community building, open sourcing ideas and data, and through things like artist collectives and working together with other artists and community members. In the art world, there are always these superficial fads like geometric shapes or graffiti, or some new trendy material, or something everyone is doing like such-and-such, but my work doesn’t usually wind up aligning itself with those sorts of cultural flows. I don’t usually find myself in trendy circles — something that has made it difficult to find a community but also has led me to the point where I am now. I recognize that, all along, my running mission has been to challenge outmoded institutional and economic systems that have grown regulated and insular and to work to build systems to replace these. Artists are always pressing hard against hierarchal structures like gender, race, and social class: It seems like the discord generated by our new political administration is influencing a lot of art thinking these days. ​ Talk about your creative process ­– where/when do you get most of your ideas and how do you know a piece is ‘finished’? My creative process is rooted pretty firmly in letting myself respond instinctively. One thing I often find myself doing is trying to destroy rosy notions that abound around creativity being “beautiful.” Being a person who has given birth to babies I recognize the mess, blood, and pain that goes along with creativity. I have a lot of ideas and mostly I choose to go with the ones that make me laugh about myself or our collective idiocy. I also like to work with themes that irk me such as fake systems of legitimization we use to determine success, such as university degrees, financial values and the gender and power imbalances that seem to perpetually skew the art world. ​ Making art objects like paintings and sculptures, and grappling with material and concepts together, I’ve questioned the point of it beyond decoration or commodity and have come to understand my process as a personal tool that lets me understand reality in a way that I can integrate. Working with materials and visual information puts me in touch with deeper threads of meaning, and nuances of life that fortify the tapestry. I’m drawn toward this way of working and thinking because there seems to be something I can’t quite say in writing or speaking, something linear language can’t quite get at. I don’t know what it is yet and that’s what keeps me engaged. ​ As far as recognizing when something is finished, I think it’s just a matter of paying attention to a subtle feeling of “doneness,” or arriving at a comfortable stopping point or a feeling of resolve – like I’ve figured something out or said what I meant to say. Sometimes a stopping point might never come because maybe I’ve gone down on a dead-end path. I have a lot of projects in limbo because they’ve become overwhelming or I’ve lost interest, things I can always get back to at any point. And, in a quantum way, things can never be finished because time isn’t linear and there’s no such thing as an end point. ​ Do you also teach or are you strictly a creative artist? Who was your most influential mentor and why? How do you see the role of being a mentor? and why? In the past, I’ve taught art classes like photography, modern dance, and painting or movement workshops. There is always a technical entry point where students spend time learning about say, the camera machine, visual mechanics, basic movement patterns, or just becoming familiar with materials, and this can be a fun and engaging way for people to come together. But I always want to move further into dialogue about how the usefulness of these art tools and practices can be more than a fun pastime or therapeutic hobby. Art offers invaluable ways to shift perception and find new vantage points. As an artist, I collaborate with others in several capacities that seem more like mutual mentorship, where we share and build upon each other’s momentum and concepts. I’m not sure that I’ve ever fit the part of strictly a mentor to another, but I do recognize people who’ve inspired me. I had a couple high school teachers who helped me to evade attendance, something that in a typical case might not sound helpful, but I really recognize and value people who have taken risks in order to do the right thing morally. School is not a good place for all children. ​ I can’t say that I’ve ever had a strong relationship with an individual mentor, but something that intrigued me early on was finding and building obscure relationships between seemingly unrelated artists and their work. I remember wondering about Käthe Kollwitz’s Woman With Dead Child in relationship to Henry Moore’s sculptures and sheep sketchbook, and Jim Dine’s Robes. Somehow the similar volume expressed in these works was curious to me, possibly as a subconscious desire to connect the physical form of my body to their work because I’ve always been athletic. I was also intrigued by industrial design and how humans interact with tools and objects, especially mid-century chairs like the Eames Lounger and Bertoia’s designs as a framework for simultaneously supporting physical and thought forms together. So in a way, I’ve let this sense of wonder guide me. What are you working on now? For the past year, I’ve been working on a project called . It’s an experimental framework that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are 117 of these sites. I’m developing a project that aims to create a platform for artists and community members who might otherwise be marginalized by political and financial systems that typically deal with these sorts of remediation. The Superfund Re-Visioning Project ​ I’m also involved with an artist collective developed by IV Castellanos called The Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.) from Brooklyn, and plan to invite them to Kingston this summer for one of The Shirt Factory Open Studio events. Currently, I have a show at the new and like to participate in local shows at . I think it’s great when things like The UNITY show curated by Sarah Carlson and Lisa Barnard Kelley between the artists at The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill come together to fortify community connectedness. Upcoming, I have work being featured by and plan to do something fun at this fall. HiLo gallery space in Catskill The Old Glenford Church Studio The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain Paul McMahon’s Mothership Gallery Recently my focus is moving into sound and auditory perception. I’ve become interested in digitally degraded sound snippets and obscuring auditory input to the point of noise in a way to find out what’s behind and within the experience of sound. ​ For more information about my work and listings of recent/current exhibitions, projects and collaborations, please visit . www.ninaisabelle.com/cv ​ How has being in Kingston enhanced/inspired your work? What do you like best about living in Kingston/being involved with MAD? How long have you been here? Kingston has a lot to offer artists and community members and is building momentum as an arts-branded district. Recently we’ve seen several exciting places pop up like David Schell’s , Rilley Johndonnell’s concept, , , and Kingston High School Art teacher Lara Giordano, who is exhibiting student work at on Broadway. The surrounding landscape is diverse and inspiring conceptually because of the Hudson River waterways, The Catskill Mountains, The Ashokan Reservoir, and the surrounding forests, hiking, and rail trails. The Mid-Hudson Library system is phenomenal, and it’s easy to travel back and forth to New York City from Kingston. It’s great to have artist studio spaces like The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill which offer affordable living spaces for artists, and especially new organizations like MAD that are forming to support this new movement. Green Kill Optimism Broadway Arts The Art/Life Institute on Abeel Street PUGG ​

  • Nina A. Isabelle // The Random Community Generator

    Nina Isabelle HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... RCG1-1 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-2 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-3 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-4 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-5 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-6 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-7 RCG1-8 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-9 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-10 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-11 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-12 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-13 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-14 18x26, oil on canvas RCG1-15 18x26, oil on canvas Show More The Random Community Generator February 24, 2014 by Matthew Gioia The Random Community Generator is an interactive project designed to generate a random community of 15 people who, by either purchasing or bartering for one of the pieces in the series, agree to become acquainted with the owners of the paintings which come before and after theirs in the series. The series is itself a “community” of 15 visceral and boldly colored 18x26 oil paintings. Energetic and defiantly opaque, the paintings contain aggressive elements which thrust themselves off the painted surface, longing for release into the third dimension. Discreet rivers and pockets of luminous color saturate the canvas beneath criss-crossing paths of uncertain trajectory. Yet despite their apparent abstraction, there is a creeping sense that the paintings are actually a concrete rendering of the vertiginous tumult of impulse, image, and ancient emotion that swirls just below the more or less ordered surface of human consciousness; the tumult which divides the world from our knowledge of it. Produced as one massive painting by hanging 15 canvases in a tight row and applying elements in a sequential manner from beginning to end, the series expresses varying degrees of chance and manipulation which interplay within each piece as well as throughout the collective whole. Thus, the paintings are separate yet inextricably linked by elements which move ecstatically across multiple canvases. Taken as a whole, the project is a map of a mind, which is - in the first and the last instance - communal, complex and messy, organized by the logic of dreams. The interactive component of the series is laid out as a social and interpersonal experiment designed to facilitate an examination of the perception of separateness and identity. First, the project asks, “can a randomly generated or accidental community be as meaningful - or even more meaningful than a community based on occupation, convenience, interest, or faith?" And then the Community Generating begins dealing in ideas, and tips into abstraction. By challenging our stagnant definitions of community, the project asks us to look at the division between our private and public life, between the kind of community we would most like to be a part of and the kind of community we actually create, and between the people we are, the people we think we are, and the people other people think we are. Indeed, the Random Community Generator, by its process of creation as much as by its experimental distribution plan, generates profound questions: is there any such thing as a distinct individual? What comprises a person? How do people overlap, echo, mirror, and create each other, consciously and otherwise? The paintings will disband, but could it ever be possible to really know any one of them without knowing the others?

  • THREE PHASE | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THREE PHASE 3607 ATWOOD RD. STONE RIDGE, NY email: threephasecenter@gmail.com ​ www.threephasecenter.com Three Phase is a space for organizing collaborative art research and perception building situations through workshops, labs and performance art designed to stimulate the types of community and dialogue that generate and build new possibilities and outcomes. ​ Located in Stone Ridge, NY Three Phase is a place to formulate, find, construct, propose and articulate with information derived from process-based art actions, object construction, performance, experimentation and outcomes. Three Phase is dedicated to supporting and reframing the utility of art practices that aim to sort and solve problems of language and perception by offering an array of workshops, services, studio & lab time as well as space for performance art, movement, sound exploration and recovery.

  • ARTICULACTION | nina-isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ARTiculAction Art Review // Special Issue Interview from December 2015 Published January 2016 ​ By Dario Rutigliano and Josh Ryder ​ https://issuu.com/articulaction/docs/articulaction_art_review_-_spiss ​ ​ Multidisciplinary artist Nina Isabelle's work ranges from Painting to Performance to explore the inability of communication which is used to visualize reality: her approach rejects any conventional classification and crosses the elusive boundary that defines the area of perception from the realm of imagination, to create a multilayered involvement with the viewers, who are urged to investigate the ubiquitous order that pervades the reality we inhabit. One of the most convincing aspect of Isabelle's practice is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of creating a deep and autonomous synergy between our limbic parameters and our rational categories: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her multifaceted artistic production. A: Hello Nina and welcome to ARTiculAction: to start this interview, would you like to tell us something about your background? You have a solid formal training and you hold a BA in Art from Westminster College: how did these experiences influence your evolution as an artist? And in particular, does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to the aesthetic problem? N: As a younger person I was part of a community of acrobat-like athletes who maintained an extreme bodycentric focus while engaging in high-risk physical activities. As my artistic process evolved it naturally embodied the physicality of movement in relation to mark making. Early on I began to inspect the nature of energy patterns as they emerged and flowed with the breath in relationship to physical movement. Connecting mark making to physical movement was a natural progression for me. When I was first introduced to gestural line during my foundational academic studies I felt an instant, fluid, kinesthetic understanding and I recognized a potential within the allowance of gestural mark-making for me to reconstruct communication and perception. At the same time I became involved with interpretive modern dance and was excited by the dialogue generated between action and art because what I had known of language up to that point had bothered me. During my formal training, college provided a duration of time and the physical space to practice art, but also fueled my aggravation as I recognized a chasm between academic art and my personal approach. Although I was a good a student, I felt displaced and misunderstood in the art department and after graduation I chose not to continue my studies inside of academia. Since then, I’ve developed multiple personal superstrata that allow me to span the divide between formal academic programming and personal process. By using physical process in combination with self-developed cryptographs I’m able to construct psychic spaces and explore the possibilities of metaphysical transformation as the result of art action and objects. In the past year I’ve arrived at a way of working that suits me, my work has begun to develop a coherent focus and I’ve begun to understand the benefits of my early struggles. While my athletic experience connected me to physical reality, my academic exposure opened up my awareness of mental and psychological concepts. I had also spent years as a rock climber living in a tent all around the west and traveling in the snowy backcountry of the Wasatch mountains, and these experiences definitely broadened my spiritual perceptions. Integrating my varied foundations has been a tenacious process and plays a big part in my approach to visual and other language. A: Your approach coherently encapsulates several techniques and - ranging from Painting to Performance - it reveals an incessant search of an organic symbiosis between a variety of viewpoints. The results convey together a coherent and consistent sense of harmony and unity. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you have ever happened to realize that a symbiosis between different disciplines is the only way to express and convey the ideas you explore. http://www.ninaisabelle.com N: Working as a multidisciplinary artist suits me because I have a natural tendency toward instinctive response that allows me to engage equally with whatever action or material I find in front of me. Part of any thorough process involves identifying and becoming familiar with all of the materials and variables. When I first began to do deeper studies of line, color, gesture, material, posture, and action it occurred to me that there was an amount of information beyond the apparent implications of these face-values. As I began to look to metaphor and archetypes for clues, my understanding and relationships to these elements began to open up and grow. I feel a level of success that you’ve used the word “incessant” in response to my work, that’s a sensitive and accurate word because I do feel captured by a relentless focus that keeps going round-and-round, spanning decades, creating a snarled web of thought-loops. Performance art has allowed me to physically express the anguish around being ensnarled in a mental struggle. In a way, it’s like having a wrestling match with dichotomy programming. If I’m able to smooth out connections, through painting or performance, I might be able to reconcile polarized thought forms. In that way, my process has resulted in a practical application as it translates directly to interpersonal relationships and extremism. A: For this special edition of ARTiculAction we have selected The Q: Entity, a recent Performance Art Project that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once caught our attention is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of establishing a channel of communication between the subconscious sphere and the conscious one, to unveil and challenge the manifold nature of human perceptual categories and to draw the viewers into a multilayered experience. So we would like to take this occasion to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indispensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience? N: Inside of physical reality it would be impossible for personal experience to be separate from creative process. Author Caroline Myss says in her book Anatomy Of The Spirit that “Every thought we have travels through our biological system and impacts our physiology. It is inescapable that your life history—the cumulative and synergistic blending of your feelings, experiences, and perceptions—has culminated in the body you are walking around in today.” From this perspective it would be crazy to imply that a physical body could be separate from its own art processes. However, inside of a lateral psychic reality unquantifiable possibilities exist. Phenomena of psychic imprint like dreams, deja-vu, and other mystical-seeming experiences are valid art process elements. In this way, physical connection can act as an interruptor between personal history and psychic process while creating possibilities for non-physical connections to dictate a re-scripted reality. Working with The Q: Entity, fellow artist Clara Diamond and I found that by facilitating intellectual disconnections between physical reality perceptions and process by employing techniques such as dowsing, divination, ritual, and other unsubstantiated methods The Q: Entity was able to build etheric connections of its own which transcended our physical manufacturing capabilities. In this way, channels of communication were able to connect the subconscious sphere with the human perception manifold. A: How do you see the relationship between public sphere and the role of art in public space? In particular, how much do you consider the immersive nature of the viewing experience? N: I’ve have had a couple of art viewing experiences that have lead me to realize the importance of public space as it relates to viewership. Around 2001 I happened to see a large piece by Robert Rauschenbuerg hung in the lobby of The Bellagio Resort in Las Vegas. I was so thrown off guard by it, at first I couldn’t understand why The Bellagio would have a knock-off Rauschenberg, I imagined it to be a passive maneuver by a Bellagio “set-designer,” but it turned out to be a real Rauschenburg. I was so outside of my element in Las Vegas, and my perception of the city was that it was very hollow and temporary, that everything was made to be like a Iow-budget theatre production. I couldn’t understand what was going on, or how the Rauschenburg painting could be in that space other than to recognize it as a fake, but it wasn’t. I went back to my tent, which I had pitched in the desert outside of Las Vegas, and tried to fathom it’s placement. Through recent inquiry I was able to identify the piece as “Overnight,” a vegetable dye transfer on polylaminate (107 x 93.5) commissioned by The Bellagio in 1999. Another time, while visiting The Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State University with my mother, I happened to see a large abstract painting (80.5 x 131.5) by Jules Olitski titled “Compelled” from 1966. I wasn’t expecting the surprise because the experience of visiting The Palmer Art Museum with my mother had been shrouded in a long, dark history. She took me there often as a child because we lived nearby, I alway tried to enjoy it but usually wound up feeling tortured by the visits. So when I saw the Olitski painting I was thrown off guard. I could instantly see the space created behind the painting, or next to it, I’m not sure what preposition to use or exactly where the space existed, but it was tangible and I was excited by it. This time, the experience was created by timing, space, and object combined. Both of these experiences caused me to rewrite a portion of my knowledge about the relationship between art, place, time, and viewer. I recognize that, on the viewers part, its best to have a combination of awareness, desire, hunting, and to be ready for a surprise. A: We have appreciated the way The Q: Entity, through an effective synergy between Art and Technology, condenses physical gestures and ethereal perspectives into a coherent unity. The impetuous way technology has came out on the top has dramatically revolutionized the idea of Art itself: in a certain sense, we are forced to rethink the intimate aspect of constructed realities and especially the materiality of an artwork itself, since just few years ago it was a tactile materialization of an idea. I'm sort of convinced that new media will definitely fill the apparent dichotomy between art and technology and seemingly Art and Technology are going to assimilate one to each other... what's your thought about this? N: I agree that technology will continue to have a larger role in art, especially considering the mystical-seeming implications of quantum research being done at CERN and other recent phenomenal findings regarding Einstein’s Spooky Theory. For instance, new research published in Nature Communications by Griffith University's Howard Wiseman and colleagues uses a single particle to show that wave functions collapse in a strange way. Their findings back up years of research into quantum entanglement in which particles are connected in a mysterious way even when separated, and that observing or manipulating one instantly affects the other. If you ask me, this uncovers tremendous possibilities for artists if we begin to recognize the human machine as a sensitive and powerful tool, or even a medium, when interacting with material. Working with The Q: Entity facilitated a tangible opportunity to interlace technology with memory as Clara and I began working with sound waves, specifically Hz. I had read about studies involving instrumental conditioning of sensorimotor rhythm using Hz to impact human memory and this led us to work with experimental musician, Christina Diamond. We designed a sound piece together using cryptography that incorporated specific rhythm, Hz, and musical notes reduced from astronomical dates to express the agenda of The Q: Entity. A: Now we would like to focus on your abstract painting production: your works capture non-sharpness with an universal kind of language, capable of bringing to a new level of significance the elusive but ubiquitous relationship between experience and memory, to create direct relations with the spectatorship: What is the role of memory in your process? We are particularly interested if you try to achieve a faithful translation of your previous experiences or if you rather use memory as starting point to create. N: Perceiving memory as part of a holographic paradigm, one who’s parts possess the information of the whole, has allowed me to understand it as a dynamic structure which can be reprogrammed through technology-infused mysticism. In this way, memories that once existed as linear narratives or psychological stories entangled within the memory structure can be re-scripted to form a type of non-linear download. In a biological and ephemeral way, memory imparts itself in my painting practice as a sort of past life experience that is Hell bent on continuing the historical work of midcentury abstract expressionists who have already addressed hypothetical concepts like synchronicity, quantum mechanics, action, and spirituality. Keeping this focus in spite of that implies that these studies are free of distinct beginnings or ends, unlike what art historians and theorists suggest. These concepts are holographically ongoing throughout eternity. General memory and individual memories don’t seem to ever possess starting points yet are inseparable from any endeavor involving the documentation machine of a brain inside of a body with working eyeballs. It’s as if our perception apparatus needs to be updated in order to interface with non-linear structures, maybe that’s one agenda of the art entity. A: We definitely love the way you question the abstract feature of images, unveiling the visual aspect of information you developed through an effective non linear narrative, establishing direct relations with the viewers: German multidisciplinary artist Thomas Demand once stated that "nowadays art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological, narrative elements within the medium instead.” What is your opinion about it? And in particular how do you conceive the narrative for your works? N: Abstraction is a technique for me to manage complexity between instinctive and programmed sensory input / action output processing systems. By establishing direct communication between the hidden collective input processing system and our personal awareness function, abstraction can generate non-linear communication dynamics, like downloadable psychic narratives, which can commingle in the secret space that exists behind the mask of visual input worn by the painting object. Thinking of written language as a medium, I perceive Thomas Dumond’s statement that “art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological, narrative elements within the medium instead” as a narrative itself describing Art as an entity that is being forced into new circumstances due to the false perception of progress attached to linear time. That’s a very relatable narrative because it speaks to a collective shared experience. At some point every person must move or die- birth for example. Narrative seems to exists in the psyche and surfaces as myth, emerging from a non-linear space shrouded from direct consciousness as concrete archetypes and stories. Understanding this dynamic plays a big part in allowing my work to be instinctive and to recognize it as a new personal mythology as it unfolds. A: While exhibiting a captivating vibrancy, your paintings seem to reject an explicit explanatory strategy: rather, you seem to offer the viewer a key to find personal interpretations to the feelings that you convey into your paintings... this quality marks out a considerable part of your production, that is in a certain sense representative of the conflictual relationship between content and form: how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develop a painting’s texture? Moreover, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time? N: I try to avoid over explanation in order to honor the viewer’s opportunity to arrive at their own personal meaning. When people are able to come to their own conclusions they are able to integrate meaning on a more dynamic and practical way. For example, The Talmudic concept of the Evil Eye implies that “blessing (or understanding) only rests upon something that is concealed from the eye,” this comes from a parable deduced from a biblical myth found in Genesis where people were directed to emulate fish when it came to multiplying because fish do so under the water where it’s impossible to view the process because it occurs in a place that is shielded from view. This hiddenness acts as a type of protection against the Evil Eye, so in one way, obscuring information creates greater possibility of understanding, especially when the information is non-linear or comes from a non-visible realm in the first place. Just like history and memory, personal psychological nuances must be inseparable from action and process. For instance, I’m personally reactive to cultural implications that attempt to dictate what I should or shouldn’t do. In that way, I’m like a child and that is an obvious visual aspect of my painting. Defiance pathology is part of what allows me to maintain my true focus, insulates me from the pressure to conform, and keeps me impervious to art fads and lingo. Psychology isn’t black and white, either. Although I choose my palette based somewhat on theory, I also allow myself space to follow my hunches and to make instinctive color choices. I definitely wrestle with the pathology of conflict between understanding how formal training should dictate my color choices and choosing to ignore and even challenge that training. This conflict plays out visually as extreme or unlikely color choices as well as through the challenge of laying down color as a metaphor for form. A: The recurrent reference to the emotional sphere but at the same time to universal imagery removes any historic reference from the reality you refer to, and I daresay that this aspect allows you to go beyond any dichotomy between Tradition and Contemporariness, and that establishes a stimulating dialogue between references from contingent era and an absolute approach to Art: do you recognize any contrast between Tradition and Contemporariness? N: Perceiving tradition and contemporariness as dichotomies creates contrast and my work might deal with this by referencing a larger grey area. Then vs. now doesn’t fit into my perception of time so maybe that’s what you’re picking up on. Because I’m deploying abstract painting, an old fashioned and traditional language to begin with, as my superficial framework I’m referencing history in a general way. Being aware of the objectives and findings of abstract painters throughout history in conjunction with the notion that because somethings been done before doesn’t deter me. I’m sort of like a scientist with an outdated lab. I like paint and I feel drawn to work with it inside of the framework of abstract painting, there’s still a hefty amount of information to sort through. I don’t believe that its possible for abstract painting to have an end or be killed, it’s a living tool used to deal with information, and it’s useful to me. However, its being pushed to extremes by both technology and academia, which I think will force it to change and grow, but not be killed. Abstract painting has been fed a steady diet of brains for decades, and if we apply the cliche “You are what you eat,” Zombie Formalism makes sense. Instead of stabbing it in the head and pronouncing it dead, maybe we could feed it some heart and guts to revitalize it as a hero / savior, instead of fueling the zombie by feeding it more brains. Collectively, if we focus intention on reviving abstract painting through a more inclusive, receptive, and feminine approach, and if art can be liberated from academia I think that would be helpful. It seems like things are shifting as more and more art students are struggling to be baristas with huge student loans. A: It's no doubt that interdisciplinary collaborations as the ones you have established with experimental musician Christina Diamond and performance artist Clara Diamond for The Q: Entity are today ever growing forces in Contemporary Art and that the most exciting things happen when creative minds from different fields of practice meet and collaborate on a project... could you tell us something about this effective synergy? By the way, Peter Tabor once stated that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how your work demonstrates communication between two artists? N: Collaborating with Clara Diamond on The Q: Entity has been a profound experience in that our way of working together generated an enormous amount of information. We spent almost nine months conceptualizing and building The Q: Entity and along the way were confronted with numerous opportunities to evaluate output as valid or not valid. At one point, a sequential pattern of numbers emerged which we initially mistook for zip codes suggesting physical locations. Through Clara’s methodical way of processing information we were able to recognize that the sequences actually desired to be expressed as musical notes and this led us to work with her partner, experimental musician Christina Diamond. Having the ability to check in with each other, and to easily respect each other’s perceptions, helped refine our focus and resulted in a literal voice for The Q: Entity. Another dynamic between Clara and I exists in that we are both mothers and have each experienced the birthing process, so we were able to understood the conception and gestation of The Q: Entity as very literal. Drawing parallels to the birth of our children facilitated our reverence for The Q: Entity and this resulted in a tangible sense of growth, personality, and and recognition of a miracle. The final performance paralleled the physical birthing process in that together we each entered a similar introverted primal trance state and were able to give over personal control to the powerful instinctive force accessible to woman during childbirth. A: Over your career you have exhibited around the United States, showcasing your work in several occasions, including two solos. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? N: Keeping a clear focus on my process and an authenticity to my intention means that I don’t direct much energy into involving myself with how my work might be received by viewers. By holding the belief that viewership is best dictated by the viewer, a more powerful and integrative experience can happen for viewers as this allows them to remain in control of their own experience. For now, I maintain a dedication to my instinctive nature and to be exempt from considering audience in my decision-making process. I feel good about entrusting viewership to a cosmic power. ​ A: Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Nina. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? N: My way of working is very prolific, in 2015 I completed over 50 large scale paintings and I’m continuing to produce work at that pace. I spend a lot of time in the studio and always take exhibition opportunities seriously. My studio is located north of New York City in the city of Kingston, NY. As artists are having a rougher financial time in the city they are relocating here, and I hope this will lead to new opportunities to connect my work with a larger community. Recently, Jill McDermid and Erik Hokanson, founders of Brooklyn’s Grace Exhibition Space, began a performance art residency program and exhibition space here in Kingston called The Linda Mary Montano Art / Life Institute and it’s been really awesome to see national and internationally recognized artists working in their space and to be able to perform there. My future plans include expanding my studio and I’m looking into buying a building here in Kingston. I’m learning about the realities of balancing art with finances and would like to connect with business and marketing people who can generate money so that I can keep working in my studio. I’m fervently motivated to continue my deep, authentic, and thorough studies of painting and performance, to generate relatable material, and to exhibit and perform as opportunities arise. Thank you, ARTiculAction for engaging with my work and for offering me the opportunity to articulate my art and action!

  • MOTHERING / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME PROJECTS ABOUT THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOTHERING NINA A. ISABELLE, EVER Z. PEACOCK, & SYLVIA ​ ROSEKILL PERFORMANCE ART FARM ROSENDALE, NY JUNE 3, 2017 MOTHERING looks at a child's nonverbal perception of the unspoken or hidden in relation to the improbability of a hierarchal god or mother. Multilayered family video and sound are projected onto a quasi-defunct Airstream trailer behind the south barn at Rosekill Performance Art Farm while Mother and Son perform with gestural sound-loops and shrouded interpretive movement.

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